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Tag Archives: wine

Wine or Coffee? Friends Fun Wine Lets You Have Both–At the Same Time

Friends Beverage Group Coffee Wine

 

Can’t decide if you’d like to unwind with a glass of wine or a cup of coffee? Friends Fun Wine is well aware of that fact, which is why they’ve come up with two new flavors that incorporate wine’s velvet smoothness with coffee’s distinct aroma that’ll give you a quick pick-me-up for sure: Cabernet Coffee Espresso and Chardonnay Coffee Cappuccino.

The coolest part about it? There’s zero caffeine and very little alcohol in the mix, plus it’s low on calories. As for the taste, well, that’s an entirely different story, but don’t knock it ’til you’ve tried it.

VIA [ Incredible Things ]

Miracle Machine Turns Water Into Wine

Miracle-Machine

Jesus may have performed this trick some time ago, but he didn’t do it with technological panache. The Miracle Machine pictured above however claims to turn water into wine using sophisticated electronics… only not really. See, it does make wine and it does use water as a starting ingredient, but then you have to add “grape concentrate, yeast, and a finishing powder that imbues the liquid with barrel-aged flavour.” Ok, that’s not quite as impressive as Jesus’ magical trick of yore, but it is arguably less painstaking than making wine the traditional way. The Miracle Machine uses an array of “electrical sensors, transducers, heaters and pumps”, and churns out what’s being called a “$20 bottle of wine” from $2 worth of ingredients in about 3 days. Using a smartphone app, your job is simply to select the type of wine you want, add the ingredients and wait. You’ll get a notification when your wine is ready to drink.

There’s going to be a Kickstarter soon, with the expected retail price at around $500, though the early adopter figure should be much lower. You can register on their website to be notified when the campaign goes live.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Mashable ]

So This is Baby Mice Wine

Mice Wine

Where I’m from, the older generation advises the younger ones who have asthma to drink the soup (if you can call it that) that’s obtained from boiling dried flying lizards in water. Apparently, it can get rid of the wheezing for good. I’m asthmatic, but I’d rather go for my inhaler than a bowl of flying lizard soup any time of day.

Homemade cures and tonics often make use of unusual and sometimes disgusting ingredients. Take the case of this cure-all that many speculate to be of Chinese origin. It’s wine with actual dead baby mice in it. It’s said to be a cure for a variety of diseases, including liver disease and asthma. Preparation sounds relatively simple: drown a dozen or so baby mice (maximum age is three days old) into a bottle of rice wine, and leave it for 12 to 14 months. As for its taste, people who’ve tried it report that it tastes like gasoline.

Baby mice rice wine: Drink at your own risk.

VIA [ Food Beast ]

Enjoy Some Wine Without Ever Uncorking The Bottle

coravin

If you like to sip on a glass of wine now and then, rather than to chug a whole bottle like a man, perhaps we can interest you in the Coravin gadget: it lets you extract some wine without even removing the cork. It does this by inserting a thin needle through the cork and allowing you to remove some liquid while replacing the displaced air with inert argon gas. This way the remaining wine won’t oxidize and eventually go bad. The needle is so thin that the cork reseals itself, and the bottle remains as good as unopened for as long as you have it. Granted, you could just try to recork it, but that’s often hard to do and the sometimes brittle wood can crumble. Not good.

Coravin is rather expensive at $299 for the system plus $10 for each Argon cartridge and may only be suitable for the more well-heeled oenophiles. Restaurants on the other had would be well advised to take a closer look, since this could allow them to hold a much larger selection of wines that can be sold by the glass.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Mashable ]

Rouge Sucette Is Going To Be A Coke Flavored Wine

coke_wine

Mixing Coca-Cola and wine is a thing in some parts, especially in Basque culture where it’s called Kalitoxo. Its rising popularity may help explain why France’s Châteaux en Bordeaux’s Hausmann Famille will be releasing Rouge Sucette next month. Translating to “Red Lollipop”, the concotion is made up of 75% wine, 25% sugar, water and untold amounts of cola flavoring (yes, we know the numbers don’t really add up). It’ll have about 9% alcohol content and will be best consumed straight out of the fridge. If you want to avoid the sugar rush however, we suggest just making your own and mixing in Diet Coke instead. Just saying…

[ The Telegraph ] VIA [ Technabob ]

Twist-Off Wine Cork Invented; Mankind Can Finally Rest

helix-twist-off-cork

Buying a regular screw-top wine bottle can mean a number of things in some circles: 1) you have no appreciation of good wine; 2) you are cheap; 3) you are an efficient drinker (read: alcoholic). Overplayed (and possibly inaccurate) stereotypes aside, there’s a stigma to metal screw-tops that’s only redeemed by the typically lower cost of the wine they contain. It’s an often difficult choice at the liquor store, a tradeoff between class and pice. But the Helix cork pictured above could bridge that gap. In testing for about four years, the product is a result of a collaboration between “cork manufacturer Amorim and those at bottle-making company O-I. The new threaded, resealable design (and matching threaded bottle neck) is aimed at the “popular premium” wine market, which includes bottles that retail for between $8-$15, roughly.” Yes, this does mean these types of new corks will only work with matching bottles, since the grooves must fit in the treads to create a tight seal. You do, however, end up with an easily resealable bottle of wine, sold at a reasonable price, that doesn’t come with the common stigma of metal screw-tops.

And why spend 4 years testing a cork? Well, the companies were making sure the “agglomerated cork” material used didn’t end up affecting the taste, colour or aroma of the wine. It doesn’t. And even though the product was unveiled yesterday at the Vinexpo in Bordeaux, it’s going to be a couple of years before you see it in shelves.

VIA [ Gizmodo ]

Have Yourself a Cheesy Valentine’s With Some Cheeseburger Red Wine

Cheeseburger Wibne

What’s wrong with having cheeseburgers on your Valentine’s date this year? Times are tough and fancy dinners are out of the question in this bad economy, especially if you’re already holding down two jobs to make ends meet. But while you can do away with the five-course meal, don’t do away with the wine, because a good nightcap sometimes makes all the difference.

There’s only one drink you can turn to after a meal of cheeseburgers, and that’s Rootstock Cellars‘ Cheeseburger Red wine. Its flavor was designed to complement a post-burger palate and is described as “smooth and jammy, bursting with red fruit that so perfectly compliment a slight char.”

Each bottle is priced at $12.99.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Food Beast ]

Classy: Wine Glass Sippy Cup

Nothing says “I’m an upstanding member of society” than being seen walking around with a sippy cup filled with wine. Oh sure, it could be anything in there. Could be juice. But the fact that the hollowed out innards are shaped just like a wine glass when they don’t have to be is proof enough that the object is making a statement. It’s saying “hey, I’m a sippy cup that’s meant to be filled with wine.” But that’s ok, we don’t just. Of course, if you’re going to be traipsing around town sipping wine from a plastic container, it might was well be spill and shatter proof. Which the Vino2Go (as it’s called) certainly is.

Each $15 BPS-free plastic cup holds 10 oz. of liquid. That’s not much. You better ask your significant other to carry the wine purse for refills.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]

VinOice Wine Chiller Also Has Drip Free Spout

Almost one year ago we featured the Corkicle, a cooled, icicle shaped rod that was meant to be inserted into a wine bottle to keep it at ideal drinking temperature. The idea was that you’d normally cool a bottle of white anyway, then open it, pour some out to drink and insert the Corkicle into the half empty bottle to maintain the right temp longer. The VinOice pictured above does the exact same thing, except it one-ups the Corkicle in that it also features a drip free spout. That… is pretty much it.

It’s $30.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ TheGreenHead ]