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Tag Archives: Prototype

Peril Sensitivity Glasses Shut Out Stuff That Might Freak You Out

Peril Sensitivity Sunglasses

Fight or flight. Which response would you choose if you’re faced with one of your worst fears? If you often go for the former, then you might want to look into these Peril Sensitivity glasses. As the name implies, these glasses are “sensitive” to things that stress you out or cause anxiety. It determines this by checking your vital stats, care of the temperature sensor, pulse sensor, ambient light sensor, sound detector sensor, and accelerometer crammed into the device.

Once your anxiety level is up, the glasses shut down and black out your vision by making the glasses opaque. In short, these glasses let you block out the problem by blacking it out. Out of sight, out of mind–do you agree?

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Kinetic Jump Rope Charges Your Phone While You Jump

Jump Rope Charger

Over the years, people have come up with all sorts of concepts and prototypes that can charge up your phone or mobile device without needing electricity. For example, take the onE Puck, which uses the heat from your cup of coffee to power up your device. Then there’s SolePower, which is a removable insole that generates energy in order to charge your phone, MP3 player, or tablet as you walk.

In the same category as these is the PULSE kinetic jump rope, which generated power for your device’s batteries with every jump that you make. It looks like a typical jump rope, except for the fact that its got a pair of dynamos built into the handles. These, in turn, are connected to a rechargeable battery, where the generated energy is stored.

PULSE is available in a limited beta test run at $129. Only 100 will be made available.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Dvice ]

Personal Energy Orb Makes You Cycle Before You Can Use Your PC

Spending ungodly amounts of time in sitting in front of a PC is bad for you. Mkay? But yeah, you’re lazy, we get it, so as always technology comes to the rescue. Developed by two students at the University of Munich for a physical computing course, the Personal Energy Orb is an Arduino-based device that keeps track of how much you’ve cycled, and rewards your efforts by letting you use your computer properly. An LED-filled orb is attached to your handlebars, while a revolution counter keeps track of distance traveled. The more you pedal, the more the orb shifts to green. Come back home with a fully green orb and you can use your PC normally. A red orb on the other hand means that Windows will set the mouse sensitivity to its lowest setting, annoying the heck out of you until you decide to either throw the whole thing in the garbage, or actually go outside for some activity.

Considering it’s a school project, the two students were happy to see that it did in fact work, though it wasn’t without its occasional hiccups, mostly battery related. As for commercialization, there doesn’t seem to be any clears plans for that.

PEO – Personal Energy Orb from Janko Hofmann on Vimeo.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ Engadget ]

Wireless Bicycles On The Way

By David Ponce

We’ve never come to see the snaking wires on a bicycle as that much of a hassle, yet there is research underway to get rid of them altogether. And unlike existing wireless gear-shifters, reliability is somewhat of an issue when it comes to braking. The worst that happens if your bike doesn’t shift is that it doesn’t shift. Miss out of the brakes and it could be a fast-track to the bottom of a ravine. So researchers at Germany’s Saarland University have developed a prototype wireless braking system with 99.999999999997% reliability. The number of nines on that figure is important: it means it would fail three times out of a trillion braking attempts, which isn’t so bad. There’s no handle either, everything is accomplished through pressure sensors in the handlebar that apply braking force proportional to your grip (past a predetermined threshold). A receiver box interprets the signals and stops the bike “within 250 milliseconds. At that speed, a cyclist traveling at 30 km/h (18.6 mph) would have to react at least two meters (6.6 feet) before the point at which they needed to stop.” It’s not ideal but they’re working on improving this figure.

There is no clear path to marketplace at the moment, although lessons learned in this project could help engineers develop wireless systems with very high degrees of reliability.

[ Press Release ] VIA [ Gizmag ]

Forget The Segway, The EniCycle Is One-Wheeled Fun We Could All Get Behind

a_eniCycle040a

By David Ponce

Or on top of, rather. The EniCycle is an a prototype self-stabilizing unicycle from Slovenian inventor Aleksander Polutnik. Featuring a three-hour battery, gyroscope and a spring damper, Polutnik claims a 30 minute learning curve. The video we’ve embedded after the jump shows UK “The Gadget Show” Ortiz Deley learning to ride the device. Within a few minutes he’s not falling off and actually steering.

Looks like some kind of fun, but sadly this isn’t a production device unless (like so many things) Polutnik finds some funding to market it. There are currently only two models he built himself.

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Robotic Lifeguard Saves Your Life Using Silicon Instead Of Silicone


By Jonathan Kimak

The Seascout is a prototype rescue craft designed and created by Andre Harley. He created the prototype using the Lego mindstorms robotics NXT kit. The Seascout will use GPS to track anyone who has fallen into the water. It will scoop the person up and take them to safety. It will also have radios so that the person in the water can communicate with someone on the shore(or boat). It is also intended to be able to work in situations and weather that a human lifeguard would not be able to handle.

So now we have robots that can serve beer and robots that can save you when you get drunk and fall into the ocean. Forget about terminators taking over the world. We’re being taken over by helpful and cute Wall-Es.

[ Andre Harley ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]