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Tag Archives: Printing

Prinics Digital Photo Frame Printers

Prinic 8-inch Photo Frame Printers (Images courtesy Prinics)
By Andrew Liszewski

It’s easy to share a digital photo via email or a public website, but how do you accommodate those family members who haven’t quite embraced the digital age just yet? Well one option is to upgrade your digital photo frame to one of these models from Prinics which feature a built-in 5×7 printer. That way, when your parents are scrolling through baby photos and lamenting about how they’d really love a copy of a particular shot, you can print one out for them right then and there.

The printers use a special, self-contained photo paper & ink cartridge that’s extremely easy to replace, and since the cartridges are completely sealed, they apparently have an unlimited ‘use-by’ date. I’m not sure how much the cartridges cost (which is a factor that could make or break the product) but each one is good for 36 shots. The Prinics frames come in either 7 or 8 inch models and besides the printer they also feature memory card slots, an easy to use GUI, a remote control and even patterned or plain black acrylic frames. Unfortunately the Prinics site is a little vague when it comes to pricing, but if they intend to compete in the 5×7 photo printer market they’ll have to aim for a reasonable MSRP.

[ Prinics Photo Frame Printer ] VIA [ Gizmag ]

Epson Stylus NX400 All In One Printer

Epson Stylus NX400 (Image courtesy Epson)
By Andrew Liszewski

Looking for an affordable all-in-one printer? While I usually recommend people use a professional print facility for making hard copies of their digital photos, there are still times when having a printer at home can be very convenient. And you’re probably not going to find a better bargain than the $99.99 Epson Stylus NX400. Sure there are even cheaper all-in-one models on the market, but over the years I’ve come to prefer Epson when it comes to hardware reliability and print quality.

The NX400 can spit out black or color text documents at a rate of 34 pages a minute, and can produce a borderless 4×6 print in about 26 seconds. It also features a scanner bed, built-in memory card slots, PictBridge support and a 2.5 inch LCD display that allows you to do everything from make copies to touch up photos without having to boot up your PC. The NX400 also uses Epson’s instant dry DURABrite Ultra Ink which allows your prints to be handled as soon as they come off the printer and also makes them smudge, water and fade resistant.

Of course it’s no secret that printer manufacturers are happy to sell their hardware on the cheap and make their real money when it comes to replacement ink cartridges. But a high-capacity black ink cartridge for the NX400 runs $19.99, while a set of cyan, magenta and yellow DURABrite Ultra Ink cartridges runs $37.04. Definitely not dirt cheap, but not terribly expensive either.

[ Epson Stylus NX400 ] VIA [ Electronista ]

Planon Printstik Portable Printer

Planon PrintStik PS910 (Image courtesy Planon)
By Andrew Liszewski

While the world is slowly moving away from the need for printed documents, it will still be some time before we can ditch our printers altogether. In fact I really only use mine for printing the occasional ticket or other travel documents, which is what the Printstik from Planon seems ideal for. At just 1″ x 10.75″ x 1.9″ it’s small enough to be stored in the bottom of your laptop bag for when those random ‘print emergencies’ come up while on the road.

It features a USB port for connecting to a laptop as well as Bluetooth for printing documents directly off of a smartphone or PDA. One thing I particularly like is that it uses replaceable thermal paper cartridges instead of ink. Each cartridge contains 20 pages, which means everything is self-contained in the Printstik. On a single charge you can expect to run off about 40 pages at 200DPI, and it has a print speed of about 3 pages per minute. The Printstik itself is available from the Planon website for $299.99, while a three-pack of replacement paper cartridges runs $24.99.

[ Planon Printstik PS910 ] VIA [ Gizmag ]

Canon PIXMA iP100 Mobile Inkjet Printer

Canon PIXMA iP100 Mobile Printer (Images courtesy Canon)
By Andrew Liszewski

When traveling on business, most people tend to rely on Kinko’s or Staples when they need something printed. The downside of course is that you have to deal with Kinko’s and Staples employees, who barely know how to push the copy button. So for those who are tired of trying to teach the person behind the counter how to open a PDF comes the PIXMA iP100 portable printer from Canon. The iP100 is actually an upgraded version of the iP90v, with improved resolution and speed. The iP100 can print up to 20 black and white documents a minute at a resolution of 600×600, or about 14 color documents a minute with a resolution of 9600×2400. It uses just two ink cartridges to keep the printer’s size compact, with the black ink tank being increased by 50% capacity in this model.

While the printer can be plugged in to a power outlet like your standard desktop model, it also features an optional lithium ion battery pack which will allow you to print 290 pages on a three hour charge. As for connectivity, the iP100 can connect to your laptop via USB, directly to a camera using the PictBridge protocol or even a cellphone or PDA using infra-red or an optional Bluetooth module. ($49.99) The PIXMA iP100 should be available this month for $249.99, while the lithium ion battery pack is an extra $99.99.

[ Canon PIXMA iP100 Mobile Inkjet Printer ] VIA [ SlashGear ]

Inkjet Tattoo Paper Is Another Way To Avoid Those Painful Needles

Inkjet Tattoo Paper (Images courtesy Crafty Computer Paper)
By Andrew Liszewski

I suppose that part of the ‘tough’ image associated with tattoos is having to go through the tattooing process itself. But we at OhGizmo! are all for any solution that skips the pain part of getting ink done. That’s why this inkjet tattoo paper is so awesome. Not only is it painless, but it allows you to turn any design or image on your PC into a temporary piece of body art.

Actually creating your own tattoo design is probably the hardest part. Once it’s printed you just need to apply an adhesive sheet to the printout and smooth out any bubbles. When you remove the adhesive sheet, the printed tattoo will be left with a sticky surface allowing it to be applied to your skin with a wet sponge. The tattoos are water-based and non-toxic, so while they’ll stick around for about a week if you avoid bathing or showering, they can easily be removed with just soap and water.

A single A4 sized sheet of Inkjet Tattoo Paper is available from Crafty Computer Paper for about $5, while a 5 pack is about $25. So there’s no real savings for buying in bulk.

[ Inkjet Tattoo Paper ] VIA [ MAKE: Blog ]

New Kyocera Printhead Technology Promises 1,000 Sheets Per Minute

Kyocera KJ4 Series Printhead (Image courtesy 7Gadgets)
By Andrew Liszewski

The Kyocera Corporation recently announced that it has developed the world’s fastest high-resolution inkjet printhead for commercial applications. In fact the KJ4 Series achieved a print speed of 150 meters per minute on a Miyakoshi MJP600 commercial printer, at a resolution of 600×600 dpi. That translates to about 1,000 A4-sized pages a minute, or an even more impressive 16 pages a second.

To pull off this feat, the company applied its proprietary piezoelectric ceramics technology to create a compact piezo actuator that controls the ink flow. And its this component that makes the high-speed, high-resolution printing possible. While the KJ4 series was tested in a commercial printer, I’m not entirely sure if it will ever be available in consumer level inkjet printers. At least not one that’s capable of spitting out 1,000 pages a minute.

[ KYOCERA Introduces World’s Fastest Drop-on-Demand Inkjet Printhead ] VIA [ 7Gadgets ]

Canon PIXMA MX7600 Makes High Quality Printing Halfway Easy

Canon Printer

By Evan Ackerman

Printers are a pain in the butt. I have used printers for one reason and one reason only in the last few years, and that has been to print out airline boarding passes. I would LOVE to be able to use a printer to make photo prints, but that’s always more expensive pain in the butt-ness, since you blow through ink and have to use fancy paper to get decent results. The Canon PIXMA MX7600 solves half of that problem, since it’s designed with “the ability to produce crisp graphics and text on plain paper with the incorporation of the new Pigment Reaction (PgR) technology.” I have no idea how PgR technology works, but the result is that “curling, ink bleeding and printing through the paper sometimes associated with color inkjet printing on plain paper is dramatically reduced.” Cool, now explain to me why it costs MORE money to replace an ink cartridge than it does to buy a new printer, and I might start paying attention. The MX7600 can spit out a 1200 dpi 4×6 color print in 43 seconds, has six (!) ink tanks including a clear ink, can scan and copy and fax, and includes a card reader. MSRP of $400, available sometime this month.

[ Canon PIXIMA MX7600 ] VIA [ SlipperyBrick ]

Canon ImagePRESS C7000VP Is Too Much Printer

Canon C7000

By Evan Ackerman

It’s a fact: give me a piece of paper, and I will lose it. Paper is such an impractical medium nowadays, but that doesn’t stop people from printing stuff out, giving it to me, and then complaining when it disappears. I guess maybe if I had a printer like the Canon ImagePRESS C7000VP, I might start printing things besides airplane boarding passes. This is a serious, serious printer. It requires 33 feet of wallspace (!) and costs a shade over $280,000. It comes with a trimmer, finisher, inserter, stacker, binder, capacity for 10,000 sheets of paper, and can print 70 pages per minute at 1200 dpi. The internal computer is a dual core 3.0ghz Xeon with 2 gigs of ram and a couple raided 80gb HDs.

Honestly though, what do you do with a printer like this? My recommendation is to save yourself some money by getting, say, 70 1ppm printers instead, and then pay some poor sap to keep track of print jobs and do all the trimming, finishing, inserting, stacking, and binding by hand. I bet you can pay them six figures and still have tons of money left over to send to me for giving you such practical advice.

[ Canon C7000VP (In Japanese) ] VIA [ Akihabara News ]

Casio’s Latest Gadget Makes Printing CD Labels Easier

Casio CD Label Printer

By Luke Anderson

One of my many bad habits is that I never label my CDs when I burn them. I use a Sharpie once in a while, but my handwriting is so bad that I never know what I wrote anyway. Sure, I could print out labels and affix them to the CD, but that’s a pain. That’s why I like this new Casio CW-E60 Title Printer.

This little device will use a thermal transfer ribbon to print the label onto your disc. The Title Printer comes with simple software to design your labels. You can choose from 8 different colored ribbons for your prints. The printer will set you back $60.

[Casio] VIA [EverythingUSB]