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Tag Archives: Online Services

The Venn Diagram Of Social Media

Socialven-thumb-450x438-25347

By David Ponce

There really isn’t much to say about the above picture except that I love it, and that you can get it as a $20 T-Shirt.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ BoingBoing Gadgets ]

Behold The “Love Cave”, Or How Not To PM On Facebook (Slightly NSFW Language) [UPDATED: Awesome 4chan Hack!]

oh-tracy-seriously-you-didnt-think-facebook-was-p-32229-1250911825-25

By David Ponce

[
Update: Turns out that while this image does depict an actual Facebook account, it wasn't written by Tracy herself but by someone from 4chan who gained access to her account. It's part of a larger attack by 4chan on Christians on Facebook. It's still funny as hell if you ask us, perhaps even more so now. Maybe not for Tracy though...
-Ed.]

41-year old Tracy thought she was sending a private message on Facebook. She wasn’t. She was writing on her own wall. Big deal, right? Well, just read the above and you might be convinced otherwise.

Moral? Never. Have. Sex. Again.

I’m talking to you, Tracy. Oh, and aren’t you engaged anyway?

VIA [ Geekologie ]

Eye-Fi Card Update Lets You Selectively Upload Pics From Your Camera, Plus New Pro Version

eyefi

By Evan Ackerman

When I reviewed the Eye-Fi wireless SD card back in May, one of the quibbles I had with it was that there was no way to decide which pictures you wanted to upload. The card would send ‘em all… Good ones, bad ones, naked ones, everything you take just goes. In fact, here’s what I said: “there isn’t any way to designate specific pictures to upload, or not to upload. But of course, there isn’t really a way to integrate that sort of functionality into the card itself.” Yep, I said that. Happily, I’m here to report that I’m an idiot and Eye-Fi is a genius, because they’ve made it happen: you can now selectively upload pictures from your camera.

It’s quite simple, really: using the online manager, you can set up the card to only upload pictures (or videos) that you’ve designated on your camera as locked. That’s it. The rest of the pictures will stay on your card for you to do whatever you like with. On my Nikon D40x, the lock button is right next to my thumb. It’s easy, it works, and as of today it’s available for free for all Eye-Fi cards.

Also released today is a new, uh, level? of Eye-Fi card, the Eye-Fi Pro. It costs $150, and is able to handle RAW files, as well as connect to a computer via an ad-hoc wireless network, i.e. no router necessary. These are certainly nice features, although RAW support at least seems more like a firmware upgrade, and it would be cool if Eye-Fi would push that option out to their other cards, even if it’s for a small fee, so that people who want to be able to upload RAW don’t have to buy a whole new card. I guess I shouldn’t really complain, though, since we’re getting the selective upload update for free.

[ Eye-Fi ]

OhGizmo Review: Eye-Fi Explore Video

eyefi

As we’ve mentioned to you before, the Eye-Fi card is really a pretty brilliant idea. Digital cameras are neat little gadgets, but getting all your awesome pics from your camera to the computer and to the internet is still a stone age process that involves plugging cables into things and taking cards out of things and running software and pushing buttons and waiting around. It’s utterly ridiculous. Eye-Fi has the solution to this, with an SD card that includes a WiFi antenna that automatically sends pictures and video that you take directly to the internet and your computer, no cables necessary.

We’ve got a full review of the Eye-Fi Explore Video for you, right after the jump.Continue Reading

G.ho.st Gives Everyone A Virtual Computer

ghost

By Evan Ackerman

Back in March, we wrote about a service called OnLive, which outsources gaming hardware to “the cloud,” i.e. makes it someone else’s problem. G.ho.st (which I will herein refer to as Ghost) does sort of the same thing, except with an entire operating system.

‘Ghost’ is an acronym for Global Hosted Operating SysTem, and it’s a sort of virtual computer that lives somewhere out there in the intertubercloud. You access it, in its entirety, via nothing more than a web browser. When you do, Ghost gives you a virtual desktop, complete with programs, file storage, and yes, even the internet (inside the internet). The programs available on Ghost are all open source, but you should be able to mess around with most types of files, including MS Office files. You get 5 gigs of file storage on your virtual computer, along with an email address and the capability to aggregate your other email accounts via POP3. You can keep the rest of your files synced between Ghost and other computers with a small desktop application.

Ghost is a completely free service, and they aim to stay that way. They make their money through affiliate advertising; when you click (say) a Google ad link while using the Ghost browser, Ghost gets paid. The upsides to a cloud desktop like this are many, the chief one being that you can have “your” computer available anywhere with little more than a web browser. Files, email, bookmarks, even cookies… Ghost keeps it all in one place for you. All you need is internet and you’re good to go.

[ g.ho.st ]

Playcharts: A Mashup of YouTube And Popular Charts

By David Ponce

Everyone loves a mashup, right? Check this out.

It’s no news that major labels are distributing their music videos on YouTube. It was a long time coming, but they finally saw the potential in distributing their stuff on one of the most popular platforms on the planet. Yay! It’s all good except for one thing: what if you’re one of those people who’s constantly asking himself “Hey, what are the kids listening to these days?”. You laugh, but I’m telling you, there’s a whole demographic who’d love to know what’s hot on the charts, watch the videos, but just does not have the time to look it up.

That’s where a site like Playcharts.com (careful, autoplay on) comes in. They’re not doing anything revolutionary, unless you consider organizing information the stuff of the Gods. They take five popular charts (Pop, Rock, R&B, Dance and New) and post the YouTube clips in order. Simple as pie, but useful as hell.

Now, I bet you there’s a thousand sites like this one, and I’d love to see them in the comments. But for yours truly, it’s a first. And yeah, the autoplay is annoying as anything, but right now it’s just a minor annoyance.

[ Playcharts.com ]

Thanks Christian

“If You Strike Me Down, I Shall Become More Powerful Than You Could Possibly Imagine.”

8tracks Logo (Image courtesy 8tracks)
By Andrew Liszewski

Yesterday I wrote about the unfortunate demise of Muxtape, and while the site might be dead (I doubt it will ever return in its previous form) the idea isn’t. It looks like a similar site called 8tracks could possibly be a suitable alternative to Muxtape for those of us in withdrawal. While Muxtape allowed users to upload 12 different tracks for their playlist, 8tracks seems to be limited to… wait for it… 8 tracks, just like the old cart format. Of course in the ‘end days’ of Muxtape there were thousands of playlists to choose from, which was a big part of its appeal, so hopefully 8tracks will enjoy similar growth and popularity before the day ‘you-know-who’ comes knocking. And as the The Red Ferret Journal points out, after 8tracks there will inevitably be another, and another, and another…

[ 8tracks ] VIA [ The Red Ferret Journal ]

Alas Poor Muxtape, I Knew Thee Well

Au Revoir Muxtape (Image courtesy Muxtape.com)
By Andrew Liszewski

I don’t care how big your MP3 collection might be, sometimes you just get tired of the same old stuff, and that’s where Muxtape came in quite handy. For those unfamiliar with the site/service, it basically provided a 21st century way to create a ‘mixtape’ of different songs that anyone who visited the site could listen to. Once an account was created you could upload 12 songs (they all had to be from different albums) which would be stored via the Amazon S3 service. The site itself then provided a simple and clean way for anyone to stream and listen to your Muxtape tracklist.

Well I’m not sure when it happened (I used Muxtape as late as last week) but this is what you see when you visit the site now. “Muxtape will be unavailable for a brief period while we sort out a problem with the RIAA.” Since the site first appeared I wondered how they managed to avoid any ‘dealings’ with the RIAA, but instead of worrying I decided to just enjoy it as long as I could. There is hope though that the site is not gone forever, since the following message was posted to the Muxtape RSS feed yesterday: “No artists or labels have complained. The site is not closed indefinitely. Stay tuned.” So for the time being I will remain cautiously optimistic.

[ Muxtape ] VIA [ Gear Diary ]

Real Snail Mail Is Still Faster Than USPS

Snail Mail

By Evan Ackerman

The world’s first webmail service using real live snails as delivery agents is up and running (er, maybe not running…) at Bournemouth University in the UK. Here’s how it works:

Our snails are equipped with a miniaturised electronic circuit and antenna that enables them to be assigned messages from hardware located within their enclosure. The moment you click ‘send’ your message will travel at the speed of light to our snail server where it will await collection by a snail agent.

Once associated with the tiny electronic chip on the snails shell your message will be carried around until the snail chances by the drop off point. Hardware located at this point collects the message from the snail and forwards it to its final destination.

This is absolutely for real; send your own message by clicking here. I wouldn’t hold your breath, though… Muriel, one of the snails, hasn’t bothered to deliver any messages at all. Cecil has delivered 4 messages so far with an average delivery time of 3.26 days, and Austin is blazing along, having delivered 10 messages in about 1.96 days each. When if your message gets delivered, it’ll include a complete log of your snail agent’s progress and details about the particular snail involved. I’ve just sent one off, myself. Let’s see, is it delivered yet? Nope. …Now? Um, nope. Hmm. Well, I’ll keep you updated.

[ Real Snail Mail ] VIA [ New Scientist ]