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Tag Archives: Military

Bullets That Curve In Mid-Air? Yep, The Military’s Got That

darpa-exacto-demonstration

This tech is still in its infancy, but as the video below appears to show, the US military has developed bullets that curve in mid-air. Remember that stupid movie with Angelina Jolie, Wanted? Yeah, it’s like that, only for real this time.

DARPA’s Extreme Accuracy Tasked Ordnance (EXACTO) program recently conducted the first successful live-fire tests demonstrating in-flight guidance of .50-caliber bullets. This video shows EXACTO rounds maneuvering in flight to hit targets that are offset from where the sniper rifle is aimed. EXACTO’s specially designed ammunition and real-time optical guidance system help track and direct projectiles to their targets by compensating for weather, wind, target movement and other factors that could impede successful hits.

The EXACTO program is developing new approaches and advanced capabilities to improve the range and accuracy of sniper systems beyond the current state of the art.

When you’re trying to hit a target nearly a mile away, even the slightest mistake compounds into a huge miss, so this kind of tech is definitely useful. How much it cost to develop and how much of that money could have been used for something far less grim than ending lives… is a discussion best left for another day.

[ DARPA ] VIA [ Engadget ]

US Military Creates Pizza That Lasts Up to Three Years

Military Pizza

 

Three-day old pizza tastes like crap, so I can’t imagine what three-year-old pizza will taste like. Granted, pizza is one of the most popular fastfood dishes, and while you and I take it for granted most of the time, there are others out there who have to do without–like deployed soldiers, for instance. In fact, the US Military has received numerous requests from soldiers about pizza MREs (meals ready-to-eat), which prompted them to start working on ready-to-eat pizza two years ago.

Pizza prototypes have begun leaving their ovens, with projected shelf lives of three years. Topping options include pepperoni and turkey pepperoni, and those who have tried the early prototypes compare it to pan pizza. Michelle Richardson, who is a food scientist at the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, explains: “You can basically take the pizza, leave it on the counter, packaged, for three years and it’d still be edible.”

Sounds pretty awesome, doesn’t it?

VIA [ Dvice ]

Fix A Gunshot Wound The Way You Fix A Flat Tire

Screen Shot 2014-02-04 at 12.21.01 PM

RevMedx has received $5 million from the American military to develop a product called Xstat, an in-combat injury treatment system that could temporarily plug up a gunshot wound much in the same way that you stop air from leaking out of a car tire, by inserting small expandable sponges directly into the wound. These sponges are compressed and coated with a hemostatic agent called chitosan so that it isn’t just mechanical pressure holding the blood back, but biochemical processes as well. Each sponge is tagged with a radiopaque marker so that it can later be seen through X-ray and removed, although one co-founder, John Steinbaugh, expressed desire to develop a biodegradable version as well.

In a swine model with aggressive non-compressible hemorrhaging, Xstat provided statistically significant improvement in hemostasis and survival 60 minutes after injury with a large reduction in blood loss, resuscitation fluid requirement, and medic treatment time compared to conventional hemorrhage control dressings.

There’s no timeline as to when this would be ready to use in a combat situation, but it’s not inconceivable that it makes its way to a paramedic’s arsenal sometime in the near future.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ TheVerge ]

Tactical Christmas Stocking Brings In A Little Military Flair During The Holidays

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Featuring MOLLE straps, this Tactical Holiday Stocking is sure to make any law enforcement family smile a tiny bit more every time they looks towards the fireplace.

Each stocking is made from heavy duty nylon, has 2 quick-release clips on the toe, an easy grip top handle, and swivel carabiners on the top and at the ankle making them a cinch to hang from the fireplace mantel.

It’s $20.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ TheGreenHead ]

Black Hornet Looks Like a Toy, Is Actually a Military Drone

Black Hornet

You’ll never look at toy helicopters the same way again. The Black Hornet, officially named the “PD-100 Black Hornet Personal Reconnaissance System,” looks like the ones you commonly see at toy stores, but they’re actually surveillance drones that are controlled remotely by a soldier.

The drone was recently unveiled at the Association of the United States Army Expo in Washington DC, but it’s not something new for those on the field as it has already been used by British personnel in Afghanistan. Small enough to fit in the palm of a child, the Black Hornet can be used to scout for potential enemies, survey at-risk areas, and spy on suspects.

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Muzzle Suppressor Shaped Shot Glasses Are For The Hardcore Drinker

Muzzleshot Shot Glass

You can take your shots in those chintzy Mariachi glasses your friends brought you back from their Mexico vacation. Or, you can bust out the heavy artillery and have some drinks in the above Muzzleshots. Machined out of a solid block of aluminum, the glasses are shaped like an M16’s A2 flash suppressor, and are then Mil-spec anodized for a army matte finish. They’re virtually indestructible, and will definitely look pretty badass next time you bust them out at a poker game or something. Each 1.5oz. glass is $35, but if you want four of them in a custom-desgned Pelican case, it’s going to cost you $200.

[ Product Page] VIA [ GearHungry ]

The Andromeda Lamp: Tactical Lighting

By David Ponce

If you want to add a little bit of military flair to your digs, then look no further than the Andromeda Lamp. It’s made from black anodized aluminum and features three Picatinny rails mounted 120 degrees away from each other. These are the same kinds of rails that are used in modern rifles to mount accessories like scopes, night vision sights, lasers, etc. The Andromeda uses these so that you can mount the three arms and shades and position them any way you want, using nothing more than an Allen key. To complement its rugged look, the lamp comes with a “nostalgic filament bulb”, though you can replace it with any standard bulb that uses the same E-27 socket. Perhaps a rugged mil-spec lamp can co-exist with an eco-conscious LED bulb?

In any case, the Kickstarter project looks like it’ll get funded, and if you want your own lamp it’s $279, or $299 if you want to get different colour anodized bolts.

[ Project Page ]

This Vacuum Backpack With Suction Gloves Lets You Scale Any Wall

By David Ponce

Getting over walls can be done in a variety of ways. Aside from being bitten by a radioactive spider and turning into Spiderman, these include grappling hooks, trebuchets (might be hard on the landing), and suction cups, to name a few. All have their drawbacks, but the above solution is interesting. “Utah State University “Ascending Aggies” team recently won first prize out of 33 teams in the Air Force’s contest to get four soldiers over a very tall wall.” They developed what they call a PVAC, or Personal Vacuum Assisted Climber and it works just as you’d imagine: a loud-as-hell vacuum strapped to your back connects to two suction cups and lets you climb pretty much anything, even if the surface wouldn’t have been so good for regular suctions cups. It’s loud, and heavy, and it’s still in the development stages, but the work they’ve done so far is impressive enough that the Air Force coughed up $100,000 to let them keep working on it. You sort of do have to watch the above video to get a sense of just why this is cool.

[ Business Insider Article ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]

Israeli Army Develops MedEvac Backpack

By David Ponce

The Israeli army knows a thing or two about urban warfare. They’ve been at it, for better or for worse, for the last 60 years or so. And one of the many difficulties in that environment is that when a soldier is down, evacuation can be tricky. Usually it involves another soldier using his arms to carry the downed troop, but that also means that he can’t use his weapon. That’s bad. The Injured Personnel Carrier (IPC), developed by Agilite, is a specially designed harness/backpack that can allow a single person to carry another on his back while keeping the use of his arms. It’s easily deployed in a few seconds and folds into a tiny, easy to carry package.

The best part is that it’s not limited to the military. Perfect for hiking trips or any sort of situation that might require you to carry someone who is injured or incapacitated. And at $80, it’s almost wrong not to bring along with you.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmag ]