For behind the scenes pictures, stories and special contests, follow us on Facebook!
Subscribe:

Tag Archives: Medical

Smart Glasses Allow Medical Personnel To See Through Your Skin

Evena-Eye-On-smart-glasses

If you’re in the hospital, you’re already pretty unhappy about whatever it is that got you there in the first place. And it adds insult to injury when the nurse tries to take blood, or insert an IV, and instead repeatedly stabs you in the arm because she can’t find a vein. A device called the Eyes-On™ Glasses System lets medical practitioners see right through your skin, for a clear view of the vasculature beneath.

Featuring a patented design that incorporates multi-spectral 3D imaging and wireless connectivity, Evena’s point-of-care Eyes-On system is the first vein detection device to deliver clear, anatomically accurate, real-time imaging in a wearable, easy-to-use, hands-free and cart-free system.

Evena’s Eyes-On Glasses include digital storage to enable easy verification and documentation of vein patency throughout a patient’s stay in the hospital, and telemedicine capability to share images remotely. The system also interfaces with hospital electronic medical records systems for seamless documentation.

Evena-Eye-On-smart-glasses-1

There is no word on price or availability, though we wouldn’t be surprised to see the system being used in hospitals in the near future.

[ Press Release ] VIA [ DamnGeeky ]

Car Mechanic Invents Device For Dramatically Safer Births

jp-birth1-articleLarge

Proving that ingenuity can spring from anywhere, a 59 year old Argentinian car mechanic has invented a device that can dramatically reduce the incidence of childbirth complications. It’s called the Odón Device (named after the inventor, Jorge Odón) and consists of a plastic bag within a lubricated plastic sleeve, which is then fitted around the baby’s head while it is still in the womb. After it’s inflated and has gripped the head, the handles can be used to safely pull the baby out. There’s no need to use hard instruments, which can often injure a child. As a matter of fact, current options kind of suck; you either have to use forceps (medspeak for ‘pliers’) or a suction cup that attaches to the head. Either of these in untrained hands can be disastrous, so the Odón Device provides a safer-to-use alternative.

And this is not just a quirky human-interest story that’s been picked up by the media. Jorge’s invention has been enthusiastically endorsed by the World Health Organisation as a “low cost instrument for assisted vaginal delivery”. Currently still undergoing testing, the Odón Device could be manufactured for as little as $50.

Odon-Device

[ NYTimes ] VIA [ MedGadget ]

ABC Syringes: No More Reused Syringes!

ABC Syringe

Every year, scores of people get infected with various diseases because they were injected using unsterile and reused syringes. It’s unfortunate but it happens more often than you think. Case in point: according to the World Health Organization, 5% of all new HIV cases, 32% of all Hepatitis B cases, and 40%of Hepatitis C cases are caused by unsafe injections.

Aiming to come up with safer, tamper-proof syringes is Dr. David Swann from the Huddersfield University in England. He designed the ABC Syringe, which comes in a nitrogen-filled pack, that has a special coating of ink in its barrel that turns bright red after 60 seconds of exposure to air. Apparently, the ink absorbs the carbon dioxide from the air, causing the ink to change in color.

Continue Reading

Liftware Spoon Lets Parkinson’s Patients Feed Themselves

Liftware Spoon

People with Parkinson’s often have a difficult time feeding themselves due to the tremors associated with the disease. In most cases, someone else has to feed them because it might cause injury or result in a mess. However, this might all soon change thanks to Lift Labs’ innovator Liftware Spoon that automatically tracks and compensates for shaking motions and tremors.

The spoon is equipped with sensors that have a high degree of sensitivity, so they can detect even the slightest tremor that’s made. It then moves in the other direction to cancel that tremor out. During testing, the Liftware was found to cancel out over 70 percent of these tremors, which is enough to allow those with Parkinson’s to feed themselves once more.

Continue Reading

Safe Cut Surgical Gloves Make Glove Removal Easy as Pie

Safe Cut Surgical Glove

 

I’m sure you’ve worn gloves several times in your lifetime. Wearing them is fine, but trying to take them off can sometimes turn into a pretty annoying task. This is especially true when you have sweaty hands and the rubber is sticking all over the insides of your palms, and you’re just flailing around trying to get them off and they just stubbornly stay put.

The solution? The Safe Cut Surgical Glove, which features simple addition to the design that makes a world of difference. Continue Reading

Support the Fight Against AIDS While You’re Sleeping

FightAIDS

You obviously don’t use your Android smartphone when you’re sleeping, so why not let scientists who are working to find a cure for AIDS use it instead?

FightAIDS@Home is a project that calls for the involvement of citizens all over the world. Scientists who are trying to find more efficient drugs that can be used to treat HIV need a supercomputer, which will cost them $1,000 an hour. Funding isn’t exactly unlimited, which is why the researchers found an alternative: making use of the computing power of thousands of devices that aren’t being used–because their owners are sleeping.

Continue Reading

New Application Uses Smartphones To Give Eye Exams

pee-eye-test-2-980

It’s called PEEK, and stands for Portable Eye Examination Kit. And what it does is bring essential technology to some of the world’s most remote areas where standard, less portable eye examination machines may not reach. Anyone with a smartphone running the PEEK app can go up to a patient, point the phone’s camera in their eye and access any of the following applications:

    Patient record with Geo-tagging
    Visual Acuity
    Visual field testing
    Colour Vision Testing
    Contrast Sensitivity Testing
    Lens imaging for cataract
    Retinal Imaging
    Image grading

The vast majority of blind people live in third world countries, which is unfortunate because 80% of cases that lead to blindness are avoidable and are a result of lack of care. PEEK is currently undergoing testing with 5,000 patients in Kenya, and should be widely available to healthcare practitioners in the near future.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ MedGadget ]

Special 3D Printers Use Living Tissue to Print Human Ears

3D Printed Ears

No, those aren’t cooked pasta, although they definitely look like it. They’re actually human ears, albeit a whole lot smaller than the average. These ears were 3D printed with living tissue as the “ink” using a special printer developed by the Hangzhou Dianzi University in China.Continue Reading

Would You Let This Robot Stab You In The Arm?

Screen Shot 2013-08-06 at 8.13.15 PM

It’s called Veebot, and it would stab you to draw blood, of course. And no, it wouldn’t be a fun or horror driven blood drawing, but more of a medical thing, where the liquid ends up being used either in blood banks or tested for whatever disease you managed to infect yourself with. Designed by one Richard Harris, a Princeton alumni, the Veebot currently has about the same accuracy as a human, or about 83%, meaning it misses the vein 17% of the time. So what’s the point, you say? Well, for one, the robot is still being worked on and accuracy is expected to improve over time. Secondly, unlike humans, robots don’t get tired, so you could conceivably increase the efficiency of a blood drawing operation by having a fleet of bots working round the clock. Harris expects to increase accuracy to 90% within the next few months, and will start looking for funding to commercialize the project at that point. It’s a $9 billion market (yes… in the States at least, drawing blood is a ‘market’), so he may be on to something.

[ IEEE Spectrum ] VIA [ Walyou ]