For behind the scenes pictures, stories and special contests, follow us on Facebook!
Subscribe:

Tag Archives: Medical

So This Exists: Mouse Taxidermy Kit

mouse-taxidermy-1

Things that come in kits are always intriguing; you have all the tools you need to accomplish a specific task all in one place. But it’s a little disconcerting when the task in question is the somewhat disturbing act of performing taxidermy on a mouse. Granted it would be even more disturbing if it was a cat taxidermy kit, for instance; while cute, less people will lose sleep over a stuffed mouse than a stuffed cat, we think. But we’re trying to wrap our heads around this product nonetheless. We suppose we should say “to each their own”, so if you have a beloved mouse on life support and are thinking of pulling the plug, maybe $50 and 4 spare hours (70 easy steps!) will let you keep it around… forever? The kit contains the following:

1 Mouse Taxidermy Workshop Manual, 65 mm of Liquacure Tanning Solution, 200 grams Borax, Surgical gloves, PVA Glue, Cotton wool, Wool String, Galvanised wire, Scalpel, Glass Beads, Linen thread and Needle nose pliers

Yeah, this is a bit of a sad product.

mouse-taxidermy-6
Continue Reading

Buzzy pain Relief System: Distract’Em So It Doesn’t Hurt’Em

buzzy

The Buzzy Pain Relief System pictured above is a vibrating ice pack with a cute bee-like figure on it, just for good measure. See, it’s meant to be used on kids that are about to get some form of potentially painful medical treatment, like an injection. Just hold it against the planned injection site for a few seconds, then move it to some other part of their body while you do the deed. They will feel nothing, or almost nothing. Hundreds of positive reviews back this up, as well as the Buzzy being FDA-approved and award-winning.

. Buzzy is a hand-held device that naturally and quickly minimizes sharp pain from needle sticks like IV starts, blood draws, finger pricks and immunizations, through a combination of vibration, ice and distraction methods. Buzzy combines two pain control theories, the Gate Theory of Pain Control (the vibration) and the Descending Noxious Inhibitory Control (the ice) to confuse the nerves and trick the brain into not feeling the sharp pain. Buzzy helps minimize the drama and trauma that sometimes come with medical visits.

It’s $40 and completely reusable.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ ThisIsWhyImBroke ]

$1 Folding Microscope With 2,000X Magnification And 800nm Resolution

Foldscope

Peering into the abysmally small doesn’t always require fancy equipment. Or at the very least, it doesn’t seem to require expensive equipment since the Foldscope pictured above costs less than a dollar to make and can magnify objects up to 2,000X. Made by a research team at PrakashLab at Stanford University, Foldscope is ultimately meant to be used in developing nations where being able to accurately diagnose specific diseases greatly improves survival, and where traditional microscopes may be out of range.

Foldscope is an origami-based print-and-fold optical microscope that can be assembled from a flat sheet of paper. Although it costs less than a dollar in parts, it can provide over 2,000X magnification with sub-micron resolution (800nm), weighs less than two nickels (8.8 g), is small enough to fit in a pocket (70 × 20 × 2 mm3), requires no external power, and can survive being dropped from a 3-story building or stepped on by a person.

The team is currently looking for 10,000 Beta testers. To sign up you have to send them a proposal of what you’d do with yours, through the link available below.

[ Product Page ] AND [ Signup Page ] VIA [ Reddit ]

Fix A Gunshot Wound The Way You Fix A Flat Tire

Screen Shot 2014-02-04 at 12.21.01 PM

RevMedx has received $5 million from the American military to develop a product called Xstat, an in-combat injury treatment system that could temporarily plug up a gunshot wound much in the same way that you stop air from leaking out of a car tire, by inserting small expandable sponges directly into the wound. These sponges are compressed and coated with a hemostatic agent called chitosan so that it isn’t just mechanical pressure holding the blood back, but biochemical processes as well. Each sponge is tagged with a radiopaque marker so that it can later be seen through X-ray and removed, although one co-founder, John Steinbaugh, expressed desire to develop a biodegradable version as well.

In a swine model with aggressive non-compressible hemorrhaging, Xstat provided statistically significant improvement in hemostasis and survival 60 minutes after injury with a large reduction in blood loss, resuscitation fluid requirement, and medic treatment time compared to conventional hemorrhage control dressings.

There’s no timeline as to when this would be ready to use in a combat situation, but it’s not inconceivable that it makes its way to a paramedic’s arsenal sometime in the near future.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ TheVerge ]

WinkyMote Lets You Change Channels With The Blink Of An Eye

Winkymote

Complete paralysis is awful. Imagine having to somehow navigate the world without being able to move anything below the waist. Even watching TV is nearly impossible. But the WinkyMote, a project headed by Katia Vega, is a type of “second skin” makeup that integrates some circuitry and has allowed at least one quadriplegic to control his television. By placing it near the eyes and covering it with makeup, Felipe, a 33-year-old master student in Administration (who was paralyzed 13 years ago in a Jiujitsu accident) was able to turn the TV on and off, as well as to change channels, simply by combining various blinking commands. “Winkymote was prototyped with Clio, an arduino based microcontroller from Seeed Studio” and while it has achieved some really cool results, we can’t find any information about availability for any other similar patients.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ MedGadget ]

Swallow This Balloon And Lose Weight

obalon

You’re looking at the medical device called the Obalon. It’s a special balloon designed to be swallowed (prior to inflation, of course) and take up space in the stomach to accelerate the feeling of fullness for overweight patients. The procedure takes less than 15 minutes and doesn’t require sedation. You just swallow it in a capsule, and then an inflation catheter is used to fill it with Nitrogen gas. After reaching its full volume, the catheter is removed and the Obalon stays in place. Unlike other gastric balloons which are filled with saline, the fact that Nitrogen is used helps it stay afloat near the top of the stomach. Used in conjunction with lifestyle changes, the Obalon remains inside the stomach for up to 12 weeks, during which time clinical trials have shown a “potential 50.2 percent reduction in excess body weight, a potential reduction of 8.3 percent in total body weight and a 2.8 point reduction in BMI over the three month treatment period.”

Granted it’s not a miracle cure since the stomach doesn’t get a chance to shrink during treatment, but it is hoped that the simultaneous efforts to change diet and lifestyle will remain even after the Obalon is removed. It’s currently approved for use in the UK market, but is waiting on FDA approval for use stateside.

obalon-1

VIA [ Gizmag ]

Don’t Take A Selfie, Measure Your Cholesterol Level Instead

cholesterol-app

The selfie truly is the defining activity of the last few years; it is the one thing future historians are sure to note about human behaviour in the early 21st century. But with the development of the above device by researchers at Cornell university, you can use your phone’s camera for more than narcissistic self-indulgence: you can test for your cholesterol levels without going to a specialized laboratory. As long as you don’t mind drawing a bit of blood and putting it on a reagent strip, the device is then able to use your phone’s flash and camera to accurately measure cholesterol levels. This is something that normally would take expensive equipment and had to be performed by professionals. One day soon however, you might be able to perform these tests routinely at home and email the results to your physician for closer tracking.

There is no word on pricing or availability, but the researchers are also allegedly working on improving the device so that it may track vitamin D levels as well.

[ Full Research Paper ] VIA [ Mashable ]

Smart Glasses Allow Medical Personnel To See Through Your Skin

Evena-Eye-On-smart-glasses

If you’re in the hospital, you’re already pretty unhappy about whatever it is that got you there in the first place. And it adds insult to injury when the nurse tries to take blood, or insert an IV, and instead repeatedly stabs you in the arm because she can’t find a vein. A device called the Eyes-On™ Glasses System lets medical practitioners see right through your skin, for a clear view of the vasculature beneath.

Featuring a patented design that incorporates multi-spectral 3D imaging and wireless connectivity, Evena’s point-of-care Eyes-On system is the first vein detection device to deliver clear, anatomically accurate, real-time imaging in a wearable, easy-to-use, hands-free and cart-free system.

Evena’s Eyes-On Glasses include digital storage to enable easy verification and documentation of vein patency throughout a patient’s stay in the hospital, and telemedicine capability to share images remotely. The system also interfaces with hospital electronic medical records systems for seamless documentation.

Evena-Eye-On-smart-glasses-1

There is no word on price or availability, though we wouldn’t be surprised to see the system being used in hospitals in the near future.

[ Press Release ] VIA [ DamnGeeky ]

Car Mechanic Invents Device For Dramatically Safer Births

jp-birth1-articleLarge

Proving that ingenuity can spring from anywhere, a 59 year old Argentinian car mechanic has invented a device that can dramatically reduce the incidence of childbirth complications. It’s called the Odón Device (named after the inventor, Jorge Odón) and consists of a plastic bag within a lubricated plastic sleeve, which is then fitted around the baby’s head while it is still in the womb. After it’s inflated and has gripped the head, the handles can be used to safely pull the baby out. There’s no need to use hard instruments, which can often injure a child. As a matter of fact, current options kind of suck; you either have to use forceps (medspeak for ‘pliers’) or a suction cup that attaches to the head. Either of these in untrained hands can be disastrous, so the Odón Device provides a safer-to-use alternative.

And this is not just a quirky human-interest story that’s been picked up by the media. Jorge’s invention has been enthusiastically endorsed by the World Health Organisation as a “low cost instrument for assisted vaginal delivery”. Currently still undergoing testing, the Odón Device could be manufactured for as little as $50.

Odon-Device

[ NYTimes ] VIA [ MedGadget ]