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Tag Archives: law enforcement

Tiny Inconspicuous Handcuff Key Looks Like Not-So-Inconspicuous Trouble

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If you have your hands in cuffs, there’s a chance that trying to get out of them will only land you in more trouble. The Tiny Inconspicuous Handcuff Key is just what it sounds like: a key that’ll open standard “peerless” cuffs and that is so small it’s unlikely to be noticed on your person as you’re being restrained. It’s intended to be used by law enforcement personnel who’ve been illegally detained, but the company doesn’t make an effort to restrict the sale to them. This means only $13 and a credit card stand between you and the ability to enter a world of hurt we can’t legally recommend to anyone. Heck, legally or not, you really shouldn’t use this if you’ve been stopped by a police officer. Better to just go “hey, that’s pretty neat that this exists!” and move on.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ DudeIWantThat ]

DNA Bullets Mark A Suspect For Easier Arrest

When there’s a riot or any sort of high-risk situation, it’s not easy for the police to arrest everyone. They’re outnumbered and have to make decisions on how much risk to expose themselves to. That’s often an opportunity for criminals to get away. But if the SelectDNA product shown above takes off, that might get a little harder. It’s a pistol or rifle that comes loaded with very special pellets that mark their target with an indelible DNA-based substance. This makes it possible to positively identify and arrest the perpetrators later, when there’s less danger in doing so. And it’s better than colour markers, because the specificity of the DNA makes it possible to link them to a particular crime, rather than leave open the opportunity to claim that the ink came from “somewhere else”. Each pistol or rifle has an effective range of about 40m (131ft.), and each pellet in a pack has the same DNA identifying code. The DNA is synthetic, “meaning that the number of possible unique codes is infinite. Furthermore, it cannot be analysed without prior knowledge of the ‘Key Codes’, and therefore can’t be copied by any third party.”

There’s no word on how much this would cost, but of course it’s not a consumer product, so… what do we care? It’s just interesting to know this sort of tech exists.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ UberGizmo ]

This Gadget Can Save You From A Traffic Ticket

You might have seen the Mythbusters episode where they try several methods to foil traffic cameras. If you didn’t, here’s a spoiler: they don’t work. However we think the above product, the NoPhoto, would be an exception… as long as the infraction occurs at night or the traffic cam uses flash during the day as well. The device is installed around your license plate, and detects when a flash is triggered, presumably from a traffic cam. It then triggers a precisely timed xenon bulb of its own which has the effect of overexposing the shot, ruining the picture and making your car unidentifiable. In principle, this should work. And in practice it does too. As a matter of fact, we’ve written about a product that uses the same principle before.

Jonathan Dandrow, the creator of the NoPhoto claims that

Traffic cameras are unconstitutional, because “if you do commit a traffic violation, you should have your constitutionally guaranteed right to face your accuser – and that your accuser should not win by default just because it happens to be a camera that can’t talk in court.”

His device is made in the USA, and (he says) it is legal to use in the US.

The NoPhoto’s basis for legality is that nothing is physically covering the plate. Yeah… we suspect that particular loophole might work for a while, at least until lawmakers re-write the bills to adjust for this technology. Still, until then, if you want yours, you can pledge to the Indiegogo project and get a NoPhoto for $200. This is $150 less than expected retail pricing.

[ NoPhoto Project ] VIA [ BoingBoing ]