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Tag Archives: insects

Bacon And Cheese Grasshoppers In A Can? You Had Us At Bacon

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Well… maybe not. We were about to pass on writing about these Edible Bugs in a can, because really… edible bugs? But then we saw that they’re more than just bugs: they’re flavored bugs in a can. Aside from the Bacon and Cheese Grasshoppers, you can expect to enjoy BBQ Bamboo Worms (Omphisa fuscidentalis), Nori Seaweed Armor Tail Scorpions (Mesobuthus martensii), Salted Queen Weaver Ants (Oecophylla), Sour Cream & Onion Dung Beetles (Circellium bacchus), Wasabi House Crickets (Gryllidae), Giant Waterbug Chili Paste (Nepidae)…

Sour Cream & Onion Dung Beetles? Yeah, you read that right. We’re not sure who these are really for. The really adventurous? The slightly insane? Or maybe someone preparing a feast for Halloween… Whatever the case, if you’re got a hankering for the creepy crawlies, it’ll cost you $40 for a box of 7 cans. The product comes from Thailand, and the “manufacturing facility is registered with Thai FDA (Food & Drug Administration) and the US FDA and has passed GMP (Good Food manufacturing). All individual food products are tested and registered with FDA.” We imagine this means they’ve gotten the green light for consumption stateside.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ TheGreenHead ]

All Kinds Of Nope: Remote Controlled Cockroaches

We’d like to take a second and introduce you to a new protagonist for your nightmares. He’s a congenial little guy most of the time, what with being called a Hissing Cockroach from Madagascar. One could even consider him… exotic. But he’s even more interesting now that some researchers from North Carolina State university have found a way to control brobro remotely, like a miniature go-kart from Hell. It works like this:

The microcontroller is wired to the roach’s antennae and cerci.

The cerci are sensory organs on the roach’s abdomen, which are normally used to detect movement in the air that could indicate a predator is approaching – causing the roach to scurry away. But the researchers use the wires attached to the cerci to spur the roach into motion. The roach thinks something is sneaking up behind it and moves forward.

The wires attached to the antennae serve as electronic reins, injecting small charges into the roach’s neural tissue. The charges trick the roach into thinking that the antennae are in contact with a physical barrier, which effectively steers them in the opposite direction.

The idea the researchers had was to use the insects to search for trapped disaster victims. And sure, that’s all fine and dandy, but you just know that from now on you’ll be doomed to dream of wave after wave of hissing roaches scurrying towards you, controlled from some distant C&C center within which an evil overlord laughs his diabolical ass off.

Want to know what it would look like? Hit the jump for a vid.

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