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Tag Archives: helmets

Rainpal Is A Wiper Blade For Your Motorcycling Helmet

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I ride a motorcycle. It’s great. And when it rains, well, it’s still great but… a little annoying. Most of the time the rain drops that fall in your field of view will just be pushed to the sides because of the wind hitting your visor. But at lower speeds that doesn’t work quite as well. So I’m actually intrigued by Rainpal. It’s an attachment you retrofit into an existing helmet, and it gives you a good old fashioned wiper blade. Attached to your visor with inner suction cups, you activate it through a button on the hardware itself, or through a wireless kit meant to be mounted on your handlebars. When you do so, the blade will go back and forth for up to 90 minutes, or twice that if you give it a two second delay, before you need to charge the battery. The design claims it’ll work just fine at speeds up to 160kmh (100mph).

Now, keep in mind that this product is being pitched on a lesser known crowdfunding platform, Fundrazr, that there’s no working prototype yet (they’re 4 weeks out, apparently), and that the campaign isn’t fully funded in the first place. So pledge the $49 starting price at your own risk. Having said that, if it does work as advertised, Rainpal looks pretty slick.

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[ Project Page ]

Cat Ear Motorcycle Helmets Are A Thing That Exists

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We’re all for having a little bit of originality, but we’re not sure how to feel when that effort involves strapping something like these cat ear motorcycle helmets to our heads. They’re called the Neko-Helmets and they use a IXS-1000 base, which is then customized with these fibreglass ears. They apparently offer no additional wind resistance up to 60mph, and will break off in case of a fall. At 1,780 grams, they’re not the lightest helmets on the road, but it’s not like you were expecting that when purchasing a novelty item. Prices start at $495 and go up to $660.

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Engineers and Neurosurgeons Develop The Vicis 01 Football Helmet, Designed To Absorb Impact Markedly Better Than Current Tech

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We keep hearing about football players developing lifelong brain damage due to the heavy impact they receive on their heads while playing the game. So we find it relatively sad that it’s taken this long for engineers to come up with a better approach; it appears that in the Vicis 01 Football Helmet, they may have succeeded, and late is definitely better than never. The system works by combining two systems that work in tandem: the Lode Shell and the Core Layer.

THE LODE SHELL™
Absorbs impact load by locally deforming, like a car bumper. Automotive safety engineers have used local deformation to protect people for decades. We’re the first to bring this proven innovation to football helmets.

THE CORE LAYER™
Employs a highly-engineered columnar structure that moves omni-directionally to reduce linear and rotational forces. The columnar geometry used in our CORE Layer is based on principles first described by Leonhard Euler, a Swiss physicist in the 1700s.

The LODE Shell and CORE Layer work together to reduce impact forces, leveraging well established engineering principles and materials long-used in stringent aerospace and automotive applications. Tested to withstand multiple seasons of play, the VICIS ZERO1 delivers 21st century innovation built on bedrock scientific principles.

Additionally, each helmet is nearly custom fit to a player’s head, providing uniform protection rather than the current (limited) segmented size approach, due to its 12 possible size and geometry configurations. It looks like something the NFL sorely needs, but players will have to wait a little before they can try them on for size. There’s a waiting list, and we don’t know how much they cost.

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Get Rid Of Chin Straps With The Vozz RS 1.0 Motorcycle Helmet

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Most avid riders will never complain about having to tighten a chin strap around their jaws, but the few that get annoyed by it will be interested to read about the Vozz RS 1.0 helmet. It features an innovative middle hinge that opens the back of the helmet and lets the rider inset his head with ease.

The most innovative feature of the RS 1.0 is the head’s access point. The helmet splits vertically in two parts that pivot around a hinge at the top and toward the back of the shell. This opening offers ample space for the head to slide into the helmet and then it only takes is a little pressure to reattach the two parts via two locking mechanisms. According to Vozz this can be done easily while wearing gloves and even glasses.

Reconfiguring the helmet this way does a lot more than get rid of the chin strap. Doing away with the need for a large opening to get the head through, you can have a closer, tighter fit. The chin area has also been redesigned for comfort, while the fact that it’s closed prevents air from entering from below.

It looks like a fantastic design, and the helmet is ready to hit the market. Initially sold only at the central company store in East Frenchs Forest near Sydney, Australia, the plan is to roll out to retailers worldwide later on. That could take a while, of course, so until then you can also order one from their online store, starting December 23rd, for an as yet undisclosed price.

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Flailing Your Arms Around On A Bike Isn’t The Most Efficient Way To Signal, The Lumos Helmet Is

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Bicycle riders are extremely vulnerable on the road, and despite many using their hands to signal their intention to turn, two cyclists a day lost their lives in 2013 in the USA. Especially in the dark, hand signals are hard to see, but the bright LEDs on the Lumos helmet? These are unmistakable. Directly integrated into the helmet, the LEDs allow you to signal with the flick of a wireless remote mounted on the handlebar. Additionally, a red triangle remains lit on the back, encouraging motorists to proceed with caution. On the front are white LEDs which also remain lit all the time, making you more visible from the front. And finally, an integrated accelerometer activates as a brake light! The helmet is waterproof, meets many safety certifications, and the batteries are easily rechargeable through USB. If you want your own, you’ll have to pledge $99 on their fully-funded Kickstarter.

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A Collapsible Bike Helmet, For Your Convenience

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Despite your brain being protected by nothing more than a slim bony shell that tends to fracture if you knock it a little too hard, plenty of cyclists still opt to ride without a helmet. It’s somewhat understandable, given their bulk. But the Closca Fuga Black collapsible helmet offers a potential alternative that might sway those who would wear protection if only it would fit in their bags.

The helmet is made of three circular shell components, which fold down and nest inside each other to make a package that fits inside a bag. According to manufacturer Closca, the helmet has passed certification in Europe, Canada and the States, thanks to a combination of polystyrene and polycarbonate in the shell.

The helmet even features hidden air vents, so you won’t overheat in the hot summer sun. It’s not necessarily the prettiest thing to look at, but what it lacks in looks it makes up for in convenience and protection. It’ll set you back €72.00 ($77USD), with shipping in Spring.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]

Futuristic Industrial Helmet Features HUD

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Walking down the streets with some Google Glasses might make you into a bit of a Glasshole, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a right time and place to be wearing a heads-up display. The DAQRI Smart Helmet pictured above features not one, but two semi-transparent displays that sit right into your field of view and augment your environment with potentially essential data. A set of cameras provide 360 coverage, allowing you to take photos, videos, and even make detailed 3D maps. It also means you could walk right onto a complex work zone, and know exactly where to go. You could have step-by-step, illustrated instructions displayed to you as you repair a crucial piece of machinery. With the right software, the DAQRI Smrt Helmet could revolutionize today’s construction industry and dramatically increase its productivity. But it’s not on the market yet, and there’s no word how much it’ll cost once it is.

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LightMode Helmets Will Get You Noticed On The Road

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Motorcyclists have a bad reputation for attracting attention in all the wrong ways. But while a good portion of them do like to simply show off, getting noticed is also a matter of safety. Car drivers are used to look for other cars on the road, but motorcycles are smaller and easier to miss, especially at night. Increasing your visibility is never a bad thing, and these LightMode Electroluminescent light kits could not only help in that regard, but could do so stylishly. They’re light-up wires that connect into a small control module, which itself is wedged between the shell and the padding or glued on with 3M adhesives. You can order them as a kit and make your own design. Or if you don’t trust your skills, you can order a number of helmets pre-fitted with the wires. There are three mode selections: constant glow, blink and off. You can use regular AA batteries, but 2,000mAh rechargeables will reportedly squeeze 13 hours of operation before needing to be charged.

Currently on pre-order on Kickstarter, $72 will get you a kit, which comes in aqua, red, white, green, blue, yellow, and pink colours. The pre-installed helmets start at $295 for an HJC CL-Y Razz, and up to $770 for a Shoei RF-1200.

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[ Project Page ] VIA [ LikeCool ]

Is A Ridiculous Paper Pulp Bike Helmet Better Than Nothing At All?

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Keeping the contents of your head on the inside is a priority shared by many cyclists, thus the popularity of the bike helmet. But there’s a situation where helmets are rarely used: bike rental/sharing (like Montreal’s Bixi, NYC’s City Bikes or London’s “Boris Bikes”). Since most people don’t walk around with a helmet, they’re unlikely to have one when they decide to hop on a bike, so they ride without. The Paper Pulp Helmet concept looks to offer an alternative. Made from paper pulp derived from recycled newspapers, the helmet is vaccuum formed and can conceivably be sold for around $1.50, which is cheap enough to be paid for alongside a bike rental. The grooves that you see serve multiple purposes, like allowing for straps to be used, as well as providing aeration to prevent a wearer’s overheating. An organic additive is included in its preparation which makes the helmet waterproof for six hours. And when you’re done, simply toss it in a recycling bin and move on with your day.

Will a paper helmet keep you safe? It allegedly meets “stringent European safety standards”, though even if it doesn’t, some protection is arguably better than none.

And yes, this is only a concept at the moment, with no word on when or if it’ll ever see light of day.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ Gizmag ]