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Tag Archives: GPS

Turn The Stem Of Your Bike Into A High-Tech Cycling Computer

smart-cycling-computer

There’s all kinds of cycling computers on the market, which do a number of things from navigation, to distance and speed measurements. But there’s something to be said about Speedforce’s design. It seamlessly integrates into your bike’s overall aesthetics by simply replacing your current stem. That’s right, the stem is the device, and it does everything a cycling computer should do in a fantastically elegant manner.

The elegant, integrated design seamlessly incorporates a GPS cycling computer with a power supply, headlight, and navigation. It becomes the stem of your bike for a full integration rather than as an extra part.

SpeedForce has additional pedal and wheel sensors and a heart rate band that ensure the highest accuracy. With each pedal, SpeedForce can pick up and calculate your riding data: speed, time, distance, track, heart rate, altitude, temperature, and cadence .

SpeedForce can connect to the smartphone app to allow real-time transmission of data to your SpeedForce account in the cloud. The SpeedForce app not only stores data from the hardware, but also gives you access to the SpeedForce community. Here, you can share photos, share achievements, compete and comment on each other’s posts.

It only weighs 349g, so it won’t be adding any heft to your super light vehicle, and you can pre-order yours now for $149.

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[ Product Page ]

BeeLine Changes The Way We Use Navigation On Bicycles

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Normally on a bike, you have a few options to find your way to your destination. Either you use your head and just, you know, go there. Or, you use a GPS device of some kind that will feed you turn by turn directions, telling you exactly where to go. It’ll get you there, sure, but it also takes away one of the most important features of being on a bike: the freedom to go anywhere you want. BeeLine approaches this differently: it still uses GPS to know where it is, but it just points you in the direction of your destination and tells you how far you still are. Which route you take is entirely up to you. As long as your distance keeps getting smaller, you know you’re headed the right way, but you’re free to do so while exploring the city at your leisure. It’s also safer, since you won’t feel pressured into taking turns at intersections that don’t feel right for you. It sits on your handlebar, unobtrusively, and consumes so little power that you’ll be able to go months between charges. Through the app you can set your destination, add waypoints, and it is smartly designed to automatically add a waypoint if your route takes you across a must-use route, like a bridge.

It’s a cool device, and will cost you around $60 as a pledge to get yours, with delivery in August 2016.

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Freedom Wallet with GPS Eases Your Worries When Your Wallet Goes Missing

Saffiano Freedom Wallet with GPS

If you’ve ever lost your wallet or had it picked from your pocket, then you know what a huge pain the whole thing can be. Aside from losing your hard-earned cash, you’ll have to go through the process of canceling all of your cards and filing the necessary paperwork for your lost IDs and stuff.

The Royce Leather Italian Saffiano Freedom Wallet isn’t the solution to all of your woes, although it will help you track down your wallet when you’ve misplaced it at home or when you’ve lost it. It comes with GPS tracking technology so you can use your phone to pinpoint its location. IT has a range of up to a hundred yards, so hopefully your wallet is still within the vicinity when you discover that it’s missing.

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Navdy HUD Makes You Feel Like You’re Driving In The Future

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Let’s not pretend like we’re going to manage to curb the use of smartphones in the car. We get too many calls and texts, and need the GPS functionality too much to just believe we’ll put them away and not want to use them. The trick is in finding a responsible way to do so, and Navdy seems just about right. It’s a standalone device that sits just above your dashboard and projects a heads-up display (HUD) right onto your field of view. The image is projected on a transparent screen, which makes it look like it’s floating 2 meters in front of you, that way you never have to take your eyes off the road. Navdy lets you see who’s calling, who’s texting, and where you are and where you should be heading. It’s controlled through voice and gesture commands, has its own dedicated applications, and connects to both iOS and Android devices. Texts are read aloud through a text-to-voice function, and can be replied to in a natural manner. If a call comes in, the navigation screen is simply shrunk somewhat, but doesn’t disappear, so you won’t get lost.

All in all, it looks like a solid piece of tech for anyone who doesn’t already have something similar integrated in their car. It’s currently on pre-order for $299, but is expected to shoot up to $499 when it goes full retail. We’re not sure that the $500 price point is really the best place to be given the proposition, but we haven’t come across too many products like this before.

Incidentally, you should totally check out the promotional video below. The actor is giving off some serious Zach Galifianakis vibes.

[ Product Page ]

Silent Beacon Lets You Call For Help When You Need It

Silent Beacon

You can think of the Silent Beacon as a panic button of sorts that you can take with you. It’s a small, handy gadget that looks like a control for your car’s alarm or something, but don’t let looks deceive you, because it can do much more. First of all, it’s a GPS tracker so it can show your current location when there’s an emergency or if you simply want someone to know where you currently are.

When it’s pushed, the Silent Beacon can be programmed to send an email or SMS to the people on your emergency contacts list. It will also patch a call to 911 and send along your location so you can get assistance in a timely manner.

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GPS Adventure Box: Give Someone the Gift of an Adventure

It’s important to keep things in perspective. Sure, you didn’t get the laptop you wanted last Christmas, or the house that you thought you’d be living in at age 40. But things happen. That’s life, and the only thing that’s constant about it is that it keeps moving. So move along with it.

Sometimes people can be so wrapped up in work or with some trivial thing that they forget to look at the big picture and enjoy. If you know someone who’s currently at that stage in their lives, then give them the gift of adventure. Send them the GPS Adventure Box and give them the break that can change their current outlook.

That’s not how the GPS Adventure Box is being marketed, but that’s one creative (and very meaningful) way to use it.

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This Belt Vibrates In The Direction You’re Supposed To Go, So You Don’t Have To Pull Your Phone Out

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Walking around with phone in hand, looking for directions, almost immediately brands you as a tourist. Nothing wrong with that, really, but you may want to be more inconspicuous for whatever reason. Enter the Triposo Travel belt. Connect it to your phone with a cable, launch the app, point to where you want to go, and put the phone back in your pocket. As soon as you start walking, the belt will buzz in any of four directions, guiding you from corner to corner until you reach your destination. You’ll look as comfortable as a local, while having absolutely no idea where you are.

It’s a smart idea and we hope they reach their modest funding goal of $10,000. It would have been nice if it were wireless, but we imagine that battery drainage concerns killed that initiative. If you want to pre-order your own, it’ll cost you $50.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ DamnGeeky ]

GPS Takes Woman 900 Miles In The Wrong Direction

The woman in question

A 67 year old woman from Belgium drove for two days, and over 900 miles in the wrong direction, ending up in Zagreb, Croatia, before she noticed something was wrong. What’s worse is that her intended destination was only about 90 miles away from her home. Faulty GPS directions, along with a lack of attention, were the culprits.
I was distracted, so I kept driving. I saw all kinds of traffic signs, first in French, then German and finally in Croatian, but I kept driving because I was distracted. Suddenly I appeared in Zagreb and I realized I wasn’t in Belgium anymore.

A lack of common sense as well, we think, might have also played a big part in this. It’s a somewhat timely story, especially in the wake of Apple Maps’ now infamous life-threatening erroneous GPS coordinates, a story which once again adds fuel to the conversation over how much reliance we should place on our electronics. We believe in using… your darn head! However that’s such a subjective and variable skill that it’s hard to know where to draw the line. In the Apple Maps case, where a remote town in Autralia was erroneously located in the middle of a potentially dangerous national park, we felt as though Apple was at fault; after all, how was an unfamiliar traveler to know Mildura (the town in question) was not where the map said it was. However in this case, the woman knew she was supposed to stay in Belgium. Surely someone who was more alert would have noticed they were suddenly in Germany… and then in Austria, before being surprised to find themselves in Croatia!

Regardless of where you stand on where the onus of accuracy falls, it’s good to see these stories pop up now and then, since they serve as reminders that if you do something stupid (like over-rely on your GPS), you might end up plastered all over the Internet in shame.

Apple Fixes “Life-Threatening” Bug, But Could There Be More?

Apple Maps, found in all iOS 6 devices, is quite probably the company’s most infamous failure to date. It’s been plagued with glitches, bugs and general design flaws from the get go. The latest, perhaps most embarrassing hiccup comes courtesy of a few unfortunate motorists in Australia who got stranded while looking for the town of Mildura. It turns out that Apple Maps gave them a location in the middle of the desert, some 44 miles away from the actual coordinates. To be more specific, the Australian Murray-Sunset National Park in the middle of summer is a hot, and inhospitable place; perhaps worst of all, the erroneous location of Mildura was in a zone absent of cellular coverage. Some motorists got there, presumably ran out of gas, and were unable to either call for help or drive away. In some cases, they were stranded for 24 hours. Sure enough, the police got in touch with the Cupertino giant to inform them of the potentially life-threatening situation, and the latest information is that the glitch has been fixed. Great.

But the damage and loss of trust in Apple’s product remains. What if there are other such “bugs”? Of course there are those who argue that one shouldn’t rely on GPS alone and we should use common sense. But in a situation like this, one that didn’t involve driving off road, are the motorists really to blame?

Apple’s stock has been mostly stagnant since April and a string of high profile layoffs makes one wonder if this could be the start of the world’s most valuable company’s decline, or just a regular bump on the road.

VIA [ CultOfMac ]