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Tag Archives: Displays

Behold The Citron Multitouch, aka DreaMTouch With 32 Simultaneous Touch Points

By David Ponce

German company Citron sure knows how to put the “multi” in multitouch. Where most multitouch systems these days are happy to track 2 points of contact, Citron’s dreaMTouch can track up to 32 simultaneously. It’s neither resistive nor capacitive, but rather uses IR technology which gives it “no special dependency on touch operation medium (stylus, finger, glove, …)”. More specs below:

    quick reaction with 50 coordinates per second
    optional medium between the display and the user (glass, plastic, air, …)
    no shadow spots or blind areas like with other IR multitouches
    no drift

no mechanical wear

At this stage Citron is developing this hardware and there are very few software applications using the dearMTouch’s capabilities. Recently, Germany’s Elektrosil partnered with NUITEQ to integrate Snowflake Suite on the dreaMTouch, but that’s about all we know in terms of current software integration. This of course might have something to do with the fact that dreaMTouch won’t officially be commercially available until January 2010. The system is awaiting patent approval.

[ The dreaMTouch ] VIA [ Technabob ]

Gestural Computing Is The New Multitouch

By Evan Ackerman

Remember back when the display in Minority Report was the future technology that everyone was talking about? Well, now it’s the past, ’cause MIT’s Media Lab has come up with a display that can potentially do all that fancy gestural stuff, except without the gloves.

Called BiDi (for Bi-Directional), the display works on a very basic level a little bit like a Microsoft Surface table: there’s a screen, and behind that, there are cameras (of a sort) to watch what’s going on at the screen. And also like Surface, because cameras are in use as opposed to just a touch panel, the display is sensitive to actions that don’t directly contact it. Where the MIT display really takes the cake, though, is that it uses a field of optical sensors embedded in the display combined with some fancy image processing to make a detailed three dimensional map of exactly how far things are from the display, which not only allows you to make recognizable gestures much farther from the surface, but also allows you to gesture in and out. The LCD alternates back and forth very quickly between displaying and image and capturing data (sort of like Microsoft’s SecondLight Surface mod), and it does it so quickly that all you see is the image itself.

MIT says that they’re trying to steer away from novelty applications a bit, which is sad, but they hope to “inspire” LCD manufacturers to start working on this stuff. So, you know who you are: GET INSPIRED. I want one of these.

[ MIT ] VIA [ Engadget ]

1.5″ USB Screen Must Be Good For Something

usbdisplay

By Evan Ackerman

Inside this rather large box comes a rather small USB powered display. The Luma Labs UD7 Gadget Display has a 1.5″ screen, which is small enough that you can’t really display much of anything on it. Essentially, it’s a lot like a single button from the Optimus Mini Three, in that it’s not designed to act as a secondary display, but rather as the primary display for a variety of widgets. You’ve got options like clocks, system monitors, timers, games, and even Twitter and Facebook feeds. It’s kinda cute and potentially useful, and at only $30, totally easy to rationalize.

[ Gadget Display ] VIA [ SlashGear ]

Ostendo Curved Monitor Now Available

curvemonitor

By Colin Ackerman

That sweet looking curvy display we first saw at CES back in 2008 is finally available to consumers with too much money to spend, only about a year late. For a mere $6500, you can be the proud owner of the Ostendo CRVD, a curved 43″ 2880 x 900 quad-DLP rear projection monitor. Ostendo says that most of the units have been sold to the military for simulators and stuff, but this is what it’s really for:

wowmonitor

and this:

[ Ostendo ] VIA [ Engadget ]

TOOB Immersive Omni-Directional Personal Dome Screens

TOOB Omni-Directional Screen (Images courtesy TOOB)
By Andrew Liszewski

Great news! You no longer have to go to an expo/world’s fair/amusement park/science center to experience one of those omni dome theaters. The TOOB provides the same basic experience, though on a considerably smaller scale. Created by Alexander McDonnell, the TOOB consists of a half-dome movie screen that’s large enough for a couple of people to sit in front of, as well as a specially shaped mirror that reflects the image from a projector onto the dome’s surface. And since it’s powered by a regular home theater projector (instead of proprietary hardware) you can use it with any video source like a DVD player or a gaming console.

According to Cool Hunting, the home version of the TOOB, which measures 3-feet by 6-feet with an 18-inch reflector, sells for $1,440, but the hardware can be rented and is also available in a considerably larger 8-foot by 16-foot inflatable version for use outdoors.

[ TOOB ] VIA [ Cool Hunting ]

World’s Largest Portable LED Screen Is Also The World’s Greatest Superbowl Accessory

Iconic 100 HD (Images courtesy The ADI Group)
By Andrew Liszewski

Given the choice I would probably opt for a really great Superbowl party rather than going to the actual game, but what makes a ‘great’ Superbowl party? Well if this thing happens to pull up in front of your home on Superbowl Sunday morning, then it’s safe to say you’ll be enjoying a great party.

At 12.8 meters wide and 7.2 meters tall the Iconic 100 from The ADI Group is the largest mobile LED screen in the world, though in this case ‘mobile’ is a relative term since it folds up into a tractor trailer (the whole process takes about 24 minutes) and requires something with a little more oomph than your minivan to haul it around. It does weight 33,000kg after all. The display’s got a decent resolution of 720P, an on-board production suite for switching feeds on-the-fly and its own generator which means it won’t leave you with any nasty surprises on your power bill if you do happen to rent one for a weekend.

[ Iconic 100 HD LED Screen ] VIA [ Wired Gadget Lab ]

Mimo Mini USB Monitor

bfa3_mimo_mimi_usb_monitor

By Evan Ackerman

As much as I love my netbook, the tiny size and convenience does come with drawbacks, not the least of which is the lack of screen real estate. Taking out my netbook after working on a pair of 30″ HD monitors at the office can be a shock, to say the least. The Mimo mini USB monitor provides an extra 800 x 480 pixels, which is a significant addition to the screen of any netbook, and it runs purely off of USB: no batteries or power cords and there’s a video card inside. It has reasonably decent brightness and contrast and can be used in either horizontal or vertical orientation. At 1.3 pounds, it’s light enough to carry around with your netbook, but the $130 pricetag is a bit steep… Especially considering that you can get a second netbook for about twice that much, or a full size external monitor for less. Oh well, that’s the price you pay for convenience and portability, I suppose.

It’s rather remarkable just how much the Mimo USB monitor looks like the D-Link SideStage USB monitor, which is supposed to come out at the end of the year for about the same price. It’s got pretty much the same specs, down to the weight. Not sure what’s up with that, but the most relevant point I guess is that the Mimo is available now. Or, at least sooner than the end of the year, at ThinkGeek.

[ ThinkGeek ]

“Electronic Skin” Color Changing Surface

phone

By Evan Ackerman

Cell phones are arguably separated into three categories: iPhone / Palm Pre / BlackBerry, phones that suck are functional for people who don’t care, and everything else. In the everything else category, what distinguishes one phone from another is often (for better or worse) looks, and a company called Kent Displays may have trumped that category with a phone that changes color.

The entire outer surface of this prototype phone is actually a display, called a cholesteric liquid crystal display. Sounds tasty, right? It is tasty… The display is durable, can be molded into any shape, and (eventually) will display 4,000 colors at a high (but unspecified) resolution. A jolt of electricity changes the color, and that’s all it takes: once the color is set, no power is required to keep it up.

This is, of course, the type of thing that you’re not likely to see anytime soon, but it does exist. Is it cheap? No idea about that either, but I’d be willing to pay a premium for a phone that I could set to match my mood. I’m feeling mauve today, how ’bout you?

[ Tech-On ] VIA [ Ubergizmo ]

Sharp Develops A Five-Primary-Color Display

Sharp Aquos (Image courtesy Sharp)
By Andrew Liszewski

Sharp has announced that they’ve developed a five-primary-color display that is capable of reproducing more than 99% of real surface colors that the human eye can discern. The new display features something the company calls “Multi-Primary-Color Technology” which is a combination of special image processing circuitry, as well as the addition of cyan and yellow to the standard red, green and blue pixel structure. Unfortunately there’s no photos of the new display just yet, but a prototype will be shown at the Society for Information Display (SID) symposium being held in San Antonio from May 31 to June 5, so hopefully a few shots will turn up.

[ Akihabara News - Sharp Develops Five-Primary-Color LCD That Faithfully Reproduces Real Surface Colors ]