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Tag Archives: Displays

Ferrolic Display Makes Good Use Of Ferro Fluid

Ferrolic

You’ve probably seen Ferrofluid before: it’s a black goo that contains iron particles and reacts to magnets in a fascinating way. Zelf Koelman became so enamoured with the little blobs that he and his team spend “a few thousand hours” developing Ferrolic, a special display piece that uses Ferrofluid in creative and mesmerizing ways.

In the front, the display has a basin comparable to an aquarium in which Ferro Fluid can move freely. Behind the scenes powerful electromagnets enable Ferollic to influence the fluid’s shape, to pick it up and move it around. Both modules, the basin and the electronics, sit secure in an aluminium frame.

The software behind these electromagnets, and thus the shapes and information displayed, can be edited. Ferrolic is controlled by an intelligent internal system that is accessible trough a web-browser. In this way users can assign “the creatures” to display time, text, shapes and transitions. Experienced users can create animations from their own custom shapes.

In the display above, Ferrolic is being used as a clock, but that’s just one of the many thousands of things it can display.

It’s a work in progress, and a Kickstarter is planned for some time in the future. But for now there are 24 early production models available for anyone who’d like to develop for Ferrolic… at the princely sum of €7,500 or about $8,500USD.

Ferrolic from zelfkoelman on Vimeo.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Werd ]

Oaxis inkCase i6 Puts an eReader Screen On The Back Of Your iPhone 6

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Some of you may have looked at the Yotaphone with some lust. You know, it’s that crazy Russian phone with two screens, one of which is an eInk display? Yeah, nice phone, but getting yourself a Yotaphone also means giving up your iPhone 6, and that won’t do. So take a look at Oaxis’ inkCase i6 instead. It features its very own 800 x 480 4.3″ anti-glare eInk display that communicates with your mobile via Bluetooth. This way you can display any number of things while using no power from your device, things like the weather, wallpapers, sports score tracking, etc. And since the eInk only uses power when being updated, the integrated 300mAh of battery, small as it seems, should be enough to last for several days without needing a charge.

There’s no word on price or availability, other than “this spring.”

[ Product Page ] VIA [ ChipChick ]

This Prototype OLED Screen Can Fold Into Thirds

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The large screen size of the new iPhone 6 Plus has rekindled the conversation of just how big these devices will get. More screen real estate is always a good thing, but a pocket-bursting phone that looks like a tablet not so much. That why bending screens may be a way to have your cake and eat it too. The above prototype OLED screen, developed by Japanese firm Semiconductor Energy Laboratory, better known as SEL Co. Ltd, fully folds down into thirds, while remaining completely functional. It has been tested to fold and unfold up to 100,000 times, so durability isn’t an issue; that’s two bending sessions a day… for 137 years. The screen itself measures 8.7-inches, and has a 1080p resolution, giving a 254ppi pixel density. And as cool as it is, there’s clearly no word on when or even if this particular model might ever make its way to actual devices you can buy. Still, it’s nice to know the tech is being developed and it’s probably just a matter of time until we start seeing bending devices pop up on the market.

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[ Nikkei Tech article ] VIA [ Digital Trends ]

Headless Ghost HDMI Display Emulator Looks Useful, At Least For Some

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Despite the name, the Headless Ghost HDMI Display Emulator isn’t some kind of Halloween prop. It’s a tiny HDMI dongle that mimics a display and fools a computer into thinking it’s connected to one. This is for people who often remotely connect to display-less machines, and who would benefit from being able to do so at full resolution. You see, many PCs automatically lower the output resolution if they don’t detect a display, some even going as far as disabling the graphics card altogether. But if you’re running software that would benefit from having the GPU chugging along, like cryptocurrency mining software, then the Headless Ghost is especially useful. As a matter of fact, if you have a farm of machines built specifically for that purpose, you’ll be happy to know that you won’t be needing a display for each PC, but that an inexpensive £10 (~$16 USD) dongle will do. It can mimic resolutions ranging from 800×600 to 4096×2160.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ Technabob ]

The YotaPhone Has Two Screens And That’s A Good Thing

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Of course, the screens are not identical, that would be stupid. Instead, the YotaPhone allegedly will have a regular 5-inch, 1080p, AMOLED screen on the one side, and a low power 4.7 inch e-ink display on the other. The idea is that you can use the e-ink side for things that don’t really require a bright colourful display, like reading emails or texts. This will help with battery life, while flipping the phone to the other side will let you use it normally, with a proper refresh rate and colours and all. On the inside you have a 2.3GHz Snapdragon 800 processor running Android and while we don’t have other prospective specs, the essential feature here really is the dual screen. The company is planning to release an open SDK so that other developers may build applications like e-book readers, and if all goes well the device should sell for around $675.

VIA [ Engadget ]

This Business Jet Ditches Windows In Favor Of A Panoramic Display

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We’re not super crazy about the tiny windows on planes anyway, so we won’t shed a tear at the idea that the upcoming Spike S-512 supersonic business jet is planning to ditch them altogether. But don’t imagine its well-heeled flyers will stare at a blank wall. Instead, the plan is to have large panoramic displays mirror the outside view, through cameras placed all around the plane’s exterior. Not only will the view be more spectacular, it can be replaced with anything else at the touch of a button. Want to catch some Z’s under a calm starry night? No problem.

Not only is it a novel and impressive idea, the company also informs us that shedding the windows will also save weight. That should help it along in getting to its cruising speed of Mach 1.6. That’s 1,218 mph for those of you keeping count, and if you thought a supersonic business jet with panoramic displays instead of windows would cost a pretty penny, you wouldn’t be wrong: the expected price tag will be somewhere around $60 million and $80 million, when it supposedly comes out in 2018.

[ Manufacturer Website ] VIA [ Engadget ]

CST-01 Watch Is World’s Thinnest

E-ink displays are great for a number of reasons, one of which is that their technology can be harvested and used in other products, like the watch above: the CST-01. Measuring a ridiculous 0.80mm thin, the timepiece is about the thickness of a slap bracelet. Built around a stainless steel frame, it weighs next to nothing: 12g, or less than the weight of five pennies. But its physical attributes are only half the story. Since it uses e-ink to display the time, it barely uses any power at all. As a matter of fact

the micro energy cell (MEC) that powers the watch is incredible in its own right. It can be recharged 10,000 times and lasts over 15 years. The watch can charge in 10 minutes and we expect [it] to be able to function for a month between charges.

Charges in 10 minutes? Lasts a month? Is super thin? Weighs nothing? Sign us up! Well… we should probably say, we’re tempted to plunk down the $129 for a Kickstarter pre-order. The campaign is more than fully funded at the moment, with $613k raised on a $200k goal. Which means that if all else goes well, delivery will happen in September of 2013.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ Cool Material ]

Sony’s New WhiteMagic Display Technology Adds A Fourth White Pixel To LCD Displays

Sony WhiteMagic Display Technology (Image courtesy Sony)
By Andrew Liszewski

I’m not sure if referring to your company’s new display technology as ‘magic’ is the best approach. It makes me envision Sony’s R&D department as a bunch of wizards in the basement of a castle, flailing their wands about, trying to conjure up new gear and technologies. But that’s exactly what the company has done with their new ‘WhiteMagic’ LCD display technology which in essence adds a white pixel to the standard red, blue and green mix. Resulting in a new RGBW TFT LCD display.

In the past, adding another neutral pixel to this mix would result in image quality being degraded. But the real innovation here is a new signal processing algorithm, developed by the company, which analyzes the image data and makes suitable adjustments to remedy the problem. What you’re left with is a 3-inch VGA res display which reduces the power consumption of the backlight by 50%, while keeping it as visibly bright as a standard RGB LCD. It also facilitates a display that’s twice as bright as today’s LCDs, while using the same amount of power, making them easier to see outdoors in bright sunlight.

[ PR – Sony has commercialized “WhiteMagic” a 3-inch VGA LCD module incorporating the newly-developed ‘RGBW method’ for digital cameras ] VIA [ Fareastgizmos ]

Smoke Machine Pixel Display Art Piece Is Slowly Writing Out ‘The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha’

Smoke Machine Pixel Display Art Piece (Image courtesy Mitchell F. Chan)
By Andrew Liszewski

And today’s award for ‘Display Technology That Will Most Certainly Never Catch On’ goes to Mitchell F. Chan’s The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha art piece which uses rings of water vapor as pixels to spell out Miguel de Cervantes Savaedra’s book of the same name. The rings are generated by an array of ultrasonic transducers in a bucket of water controlled by an Arduino. The sounds they produce are out of the range of human hearing, but produce tiny airborne water droplets which are then propelled upwards using another set of speakers producing subsonic sounds instead.

The video below shows the whole thing in action, but be warned, it’s not terribly exciting. Since it can only produce a single letter at a time, Mitchell says it will take approximately an entire year to spell out the entire book.

[ Mitchell F. Chan – The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha ] VIA [ Make ]