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Tag Archives: Digital Cameras

You Might Be Able To Buy A Slow-Motion Camera For Almost Not A Lot Of Money

edgertronic-camera

Slow motion footage, at least the very slow kind, can be expensive to capture. Cameras that shoot at such high frame rates aren’t sold in your local Walmart, and it’s rare for anyone but the most motivated of individuals to purchase one. But if Edgertronic has its way, you could get your hands on one such device for roughly $5,000. Yeah, that’s still a lot of cash, but it’s about 10% of what a Phantom Flex would cost. What does the money get you? Up to 17,791 frames per second is what. Granted, that’s at a 192 X 96 resolution, but you can still get 494 fps at 1280 X 1024, and quite a few other combinations in between. Better yet, resolutions are adjustable axis-independently in multiples of 16, meaning you can get 4,130 possible combinations, for the exact kind of shot you want. There’s also a rolling 8 second buffer so you can capture shots even after they occur, which is pretty nifty when you’re trying to film things that happen quickly. The camera ships with a 50mm F1.8D Nikon lens, but will accept any Nikon F-mount optics.

If you’ve been itching to get into super slow-mo but just couldn’t think of a way to do it, now may be your chance.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmag ]

Project Your Flash Up To 8 Times Further With This Horseshoe Attachment

flash-extender

Yes, it’s better to take pictures without the flash, or at the very least, without the basic pop-up flash. But if you’re in no position to adjust your ISO settings, and stabilize the camera for a longer exposure, you really have to. Thing is, there’s a very limited range to flashes, seeing as the light goes off in all directions. The Rogue Safari DSLR Pop-up Flash Booster uses a special Fresnel lens to focus the light from the existing flash, and project it outwards up to 8 times as far as normal. Used in conjunction with 100mm+ lenses, you should be able to catch a decent shot of the raccoons stealing your trash without even having to leave your front porch.

It’s not compatible with ever model of camera, but if your device is a Canon or Nikon in APS-C or DX format DSLR built in the past five years, you should be good to go. It’s $35.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]

Ricoh Theta Lets You Take 360 Degree Shots With One Click

Ricoh-Theta-spherical-camera

Your phone is likely able to take a panoramic shot. Sweet, right? Well, really, it’s just sort of ok. For one, you have to learn how to take that shot, slowly panning and keeping your hand stable. Secondly, if anything is moving across your field of view as you take it, you end up with headless bodies and other hilarious artifacts. Not to mention, you’ll be lucky to get 160-180 degrees in one picture. Ricoh does away with all that noise with the Theta. It features two back-to-back lenses which capture 360 degrees at the single press of a button. Software on your smartphone or PC/Mac then lets you view and explore the pictures you take. It’s a pretty interesting innovation, even if it’s not one for every occasion. If you expect to be out, exploring scenic settings, you may want to have Theta around. If you’re just going to the club, carrying a second digital device might not be worth it. Granted this creates a smaller niche market, and at $399, might be a tough sell for many. Still, it’s nice to know this exists and if it’s your cup of tea, it’ll be available later this month.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ DamnGeeky ]

How Does 41 Megapixels On Your Wrist Grab Ya?

hyetis-crossbow

Nokia made a lot of waves a while ago when they announced a 41 megapixel camera phone. The shots it takes are indeed stunning, even if everyone agrees that “it’s not all about how many pixels you have.” But aside from being crammed to the brim with sensor pixels, the Lumia 1020 has another problem: it has an entire phone attached to the camera! Swiss watchmaker Hyetis wants to give you the pixels, while freeing you from the phone. The Crossbow smartwatch features a 41 megapixel sensor (with Carl Zeiss optics, to boot) as well as WiFi, NFC and Bluetooth to connect to a smartphone. “Oh, but you still need a phone!” you’ll say, and we’ll reply “yes, but you can pick which phone that is!” Crossbow works with iOS, Android and Windows 8 devices, which means that you won’t have to sport a Finnish handset in order to capture images with 41 million pixels.

Better yet, you don’t actually need a smartphone to operate it since its face is touch sensitive and we think you should be able to take shots without having to take your phone out. We’re not sure on that last part however, since details on the watch are scarce. The only thing we know is that aside from all those pixels, “an altimeter, microphone, thermometer and biometric sensors in the band – which can measure your physical condition – are all included.” The asking price? A hefty $1,200, with the first batch being limited to 500. Yeah… we’ll stick with the $50 Holga we got at Urban Outfitters, and that’s not because we’re hipsters (we really, really aren’t).

[ Product Page ] VIA [ BoingBoing ]

[ Accessorize your look with a scratch resistant Tag Heuer watch. ]

Sony To Launch Innovative Lens-Cameras

sonyqx10

Another camera? Yawn, right? Well, not quite. We’re actually really intrigued by the rumored DSC-QX10 and DSC-QX100 from Sony. These are not cameras, at least not complete ones. They’re meant to be attached to a smartphone (iOS or Android), and operated through the on-screen buttons, but the “cameras” lack a display, even a shutter. What they do have is “a sensor, processor, zoom lens, WiFi connectivity and an SD card slot.” Not just any sensor and lens, mind you, but the vaunted 1 inch RX100 Mark II sensor and Carl Zeiss lens in the DSC-QX10. The QX100 will get a “larger 10x focal range and a 1/2.3-inch 18-megapixel CMOS sensor.” So yeah, you might be able to squeeze some pretty high quality shots from your phone… but really it’s not your phone anymore, now is it? Granted it’s not a full fledged dSLR either, so an argument could be made for portability. But these are crossover products and these can be hit or miss. The DSC-QX10 and QX100 are expected to be officially announced on September 4, for an as-yet-unknown price.

[ SonyAlphaRumors ] VIA [ Engadget ]

Big Shot Digicam Comes In Assemble-Yourself Kit

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Watching hordes of American children fail at knowing that chips came from potatoes and that eggs came from chicken while watching Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution was shocking and eye opening. Granted the kids were young and would eventually learn (hopefully), but it made you realize that you do have to put some effort into getting people to figure out that stuff can be made from… other stuff. The Big Shot digital camera you see above is the brainchild of Shree Naya who believes that the best way to get children and adults of all ages to learn how it works is to get them to assemble it before they can use it. It’s a fully functioning digicam, with a “3-megapixel sensor, a 1.4-inch LCD screen, plus three lenses for different shooting modes (normal, 3D and panorama).” We’re not convinced you’ll produce prize worthy captures with it, but you will at least be relatively smarter than you were before you got started. It’s $89.

Screen Shot 2013-08-06 at 1.08.44 PM

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Engadget ]

Throwable Camera Prototype Takes Stunning Pictures Of Everything While In Flight

squito-throwable-camera

Boston-based inventor Steve Hollinger has been hard at work developing a throwable panoramic digital camera with image stabilization that produces awesome in-the-air images. The prototype is called Squito, and seems to be the size of a large baseball, or a small softball. Decked with several cameras on all sides, and packed with a bunch of sensors, the Squito knows which way it’s spinning, and where it is in the air at any given time, which allows it to reorient pictures and stitch them together into panoramas and 360 views, all on the fly. Captured images and videos are then sent wirelessly to a smartphone, for your enjoyment.

There is no detail concerning commercialization plans, other than to say that Steve is looking for funding to bring this to market. Why he hasn’t put together a Kickstarter, we’re not sure, but we feel he’d be quite successful. Check out the video below to get a sense of why.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]

GIF-TY: Turn Short GIFs Into Actual Paper Flip-books

gifty

Remember flip-books? You know, that old school stack of papers that you flip through with your thumb to reveal an animation? The GIF-TY from designer Jiho Jang is a digital camera that integrates a Zero Ink printer and produces flip-books. Set it to record between 1 and 5 seconds, shoot your clip (burst-mode style), and print. Just like that the device will print a long strip of images (at what framerate, we’re not sure, but presumably not very high) that you will have to cut (or tear off) and stack into a pile. It’s a little time consuming, sure, and maybe irrelevant for some in an age of fullHD video capable smartphones. But if that’s your hangup, you clearly don’t get GIF-TY and that’s fine. But even if you’re already lusting to get your hands on one, you can’t. It looks like there’s only the one prototype at the moment, with no word on eventual availability.

gifty2

If you want a video and links, keep reading.

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Leica M Is An $8,000 Monochrome Camera

By David Ponce

In the world of cameras, Leicas are the Ferraris. We don’t quite see why, as Ferraris have superior performance, and well… do Leica’s have superior performance? To be honest, we don’t know; we never tried one ourselves and don’t know enough about photography to weigh in either way. But we can assure you, they’re expensive, and the new Leica M is no exception. Clocking in at a chunky $8,000, it takes nothing but black and white pictures and has an 18-megapixel, full-frame CCD sensor, ISO range up to 10,000, SD-based storage, and a 2.5-inch display. They say a dedicated black and white sensor is better than it is to remove the colour after the fact; they argue that it will make for sharper, more detailed imaging. Maybe. There’s also news of a 50mm f2 Summicron lens to go along with this camera. Well, no… let’s put that another way. The lens is not included! And that particular lens? It’s $7,200.

Anyway, everything is up for pre-order and should be out later this year.

So… anyone out there ever buy a Leica? Was it… worth it? Or is this purely a status item?

[ Product page ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]