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Tag Archives: cycling

Cyclist Draws Darth Vader With GPS Tracking


Look, take this with a grain of salt, but there apparently exists a cyclist by the name of Stephen Lund who took it upon himself to get creative with his GPS tracker. He set out on a 46.3km (28.8miles) course through the city of Victoria, British-Columbia (that’s in Canada for those of you geographically challenged) with the intent to draw Darth Vader on its map. The result is what you see above. Or, it’s not, since anyone with a bit of motivation can replicate this exact result in a photo editing program. But hey, let’s all pretend to be impressed anyway, because if it’s true, this is at least deserving of a passing “heh, look at that!” for one motivated cyclist. And if you think that’s impressive, you should check out the other drawings he claims to have made while cycling, including a 220kms (136 miles) mermaid.

[ BoredPanda ]

The Boncho Is The Lovechild Of A Bike And A Poncho


Or at least, that’s the gist behind the moniker. The Boncho is a waterproof, well, poncho that keeps you dry while riding your bike. There are some like it on the market, although the Boncho does have “an additional semi-rigid section that extends over the handlebars, protecting the wearer’s legs from the rain and keeping them dry. Two fabric strips on the underside of the extended section allow the user to hold it in place while still gripping the handlebars.” It packs away nicely into its own carrying pouch, and unfurls in just a few seconds for added convenience. Sure, you’ll look a little silly wearing it, but if getting wet while on two wheels really isn’t your cup of tea, you won’t mind. At a €55 (US$60) pledge to get yours, it isn’t outrageously priced either.


[ Project Page ] VIA [ Gizmag ]

Turn The Stem Of Your Bike Into A High-Tech Cycling Computer


There’s all kinds of cycling computers on the market, which do a number of things from navigation, to distance and speed measurements. But there’s something to be said about Speedforce’s design. It seamlessly integrates into your bike’s overall aesthetics by simply replacing your current stem. That’s right, the stem is the device, and it does everything a cycling computer should do in a fantastically elegant manner.

The elegant, integrated design seamlessly incorporates a GPS cycling computer with a power supply, headlight, and navigation. It becomes the stem of your bike for a full integration rather than as an extra part.

SpeedForce has additional pedal and wheel sensors and a heart rate band that ensure the highest accuracy. With each pedal, SpeedForce can pick up and calculate your riding data: speed, time, distance, track, heart rate, altitude, temperature, and cadence .

SpeedForce can connect to the smartphone app to allow real-time transmission of data to your SpeedForce account in the cloud. The SpeedForce app not only stores data from the hardware, but also gives you access to the SpeedForce community. Here, you can share photos, share achievements, compete and comment on each other’s posts.

It only weighs 349g, so it won’t be adding any heft to your super light vehicle, and you can pre-order yours now for $149.


[ Product Page ]

Rear Vision Mirror for Cyclists

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There’s a bunch of safety-minded stuff out there for cyclists, from rear view radars, to LED turn signals, to reflective gloves and socks. Sometimes though, going a little less high-tech can be as effective, and the Rear View Mirror for Cyclists appears to do its job just fine. Worn as an armband, the mirror lets you see what’s behind you without you having to affix any potentially unsightly mirror to your fancy road bike. “With high quality 5 year UV weather resistant materials, the CLASSIC RearViz bicycle mirror also comes with an Identification Pouch inside the armband, for a Medical ID Tag with “In Case of Emergency” tag.” It’s nice to know they hope for the best but also prepare for the worst, so we appreciate the ICE tag. At AUD $50.00 (around $35USD), it’s an inexpensive way to stay just a little bit safer on two wheels.

[ Product Page ]

The Loud Mini Is A Car Horn For Bicycles


Cycling is great, both for the environment and for yourself. But it’s not without its dangers, not the least of which is how hard it is for motorists to notice you even exist. We tend to be primed to detect other cars, and mostly, to hear other cars. Well, the Loud Mini is a small horn that you attach to your bike, but that sounds just like a car horn, and is just as loud at 125dB! At the press of a button you’ll emit the same kind of sound motorists are used to hear when an oncoming car wants to signal potential danger; they’ll break instinctively, before even knowing where the sound is coming from. This is exactly the sort of reaction a vulnerable cyclist is looking for, and can make the difference between an uneventful trip to the grocery store and a detour to the emergency room. A single charge will last up to 4 months, or 480 seconds of honking. It’s weather resistant, is easy to mount, and weighs only 410 grams. With a $149 pledge, you can get one in black.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ LikeCool ]

BeeLine Changes The Way We Use Navigation On Bicycles


Normally on a bike, you have a few options to find your way to your destination. Either you use your head and just, you know, go there. Or, you use a GPS device of some kind that will feed you turn by turn directions, telling you exactly where to go. It’ll get you there, sure, but it also takes away one of the most important features of being on a bike: the freedom to go anywhere you want. BeeLine approaches this differently: it still uses GPS to know where it is, but it just points you in the direction of your destination and tells you how far you still are. Which route you take is entirely up to you. As long as your distance keeps getting smaller, you know you’re headed the right way, but you’re free to do so while exploring the city at your leisure. It’s also safer, since you won’t feel pressured into taking turns at intersections that don’t feel right for you. It sits on your handlebar, unobtrusively, and consumes so little power that you’ll be able to go months between charges. Through the app you can set your destination, add waypoints, and it is smartly designed to automatically add a waypoint if your route takes you across a must-use route, like a bridge.

It’s a cool device, and will cost you around $60 as a pledge to get yours, with delivery in August 2016.


[ Project Page ]

Redshit Redshift Shocktop Gives You A more Comfortable Bike Ride

There’s a few things you can do to smooth out your bike ride, from outfitting your bike with shocks and springs, to a simple gel mat on the seat. Shocks and springs are kind of a no-go on road bikes, so the Redshift Shocktop will be welcomed by speed aficionados looking for less vibrations on their next ride. The Shocktop approaches the issue of bumpy rides with a bendable stem that allows the handlebars to travel up and down with every crevice you ride over, smoothing everything out. Large bumps saw a reduction of up to 70%, while the simple “road buzz” that every rider is used to is pretty much eliminated. The company offers several length stems, with different stiffness levels (thanks to twin interchangeable elastomers), so that you can adjust your experience to your liking. Installation is done in minutes and requires no special tools other than maybe a screwdriver.

It’s $109, you can pre-order it now, and expect delivery in April 2016, in time for the 2016 riding season.


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The Varia™ Rearview Bike Radar Keeps Cyclists Safer From Getting Hit From Behind


You’ve seen them: cyclists riding in the middle of the lane, as if they own the road. We can understand the desire to stay away from potentially dangerous curbside holes, but this practice can be dangerous when coupled with less-than-fully-attentive motorists. The Varia™ Rearview Bike Radar (by Garmin) alerts cyclists of an approaching vehicle as far as 150 meters away, allowing them to get a little closer to the edge of the road minimizing the chances of getting hit. The device also pairs with “compatible Edge cycling computers. The Edge computer or Varia head unit can then show multiple approaching vehicles and indicates the relative speed of approach and threat level.” It also pairs with Varia Smart Bike Lights which flash with increasing intensity as vehicles get closer, thus also alerting the drivers of the presence of a vulnerable cyclist on the road.

It’s a great system for cyclist safety, although you’ll have to pay a fairly hefty price for it. It’s £159.99, or about $249USD.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmag ]

Litelok Bike Lock Is Both Lightweight, And Sturdy


Securing your bike in public is a delicate affair. Maybe you want to be super safe, but then you’ll have to carry really heavy U-locks. Or if you care about portability, you might sacrifice some safety. But the Litelok hopes to give you the best of both worlds. Created by one Professor Neil Barron, an industrial designer and entrepreneur with a background in Aeronautics and Astronautics, the flexible lock is made of a newly patented material called Boaflexicore®. It’s made of multiple layers of materials, where “each layer provides additional security, meaning it can withstand sustained attack from tools like cable cutters, bolt croppers and hacksaws.” It’s been tested to exceed “British and International lock quality standards and in-house testing has proven that it takes well over five minutes to cut or break the strap and lock.” It weighs under 1kg (2.2lbs), is 29 inches long, and the lock only requires a key when you’re unfastening it, meaning it takes less time to secure your bike. And its beefy appearance looks like it means business, potentially discouraging would-be thieves before they even try to cut it.

It’s yours for a £80 ($117 USD) pledge, with shipping in August.


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