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Tag Archives: chemistry

Powdered Alcohol On The Way? Maybe

powdered-alcohol

Palcohol is a powder than, when mixed with water, will turn it into Vodka or Rum. It’s great for camping trips, for example, where lugging big bottles of liquor can be a pain. Instead, the powdered alcohol will take up less space and weight, and can be mixed with water from a stream, or liquids you bring yourself (like juice). Each packet of Palcohol contains enough powder to make a standard concentration drink, if mixed with 5 ounces of liquid. The company also plans on selling flavoured versions of the powder, so that you may have a full standard drink (like Margaritas, or Cosmopolitans) without needing to add anything more than plain water.

There is some discussion over whether the product is legal for sale in the US, with approval being granted and retracted only 13 days later. Upon closer inspection, it does appear to be a technical issue related to labels, rather than a rejection of the product for sale on US shelves. Which means that if all goes well, you’ll be able to get either type of Palcohol (Vodka or Rum) by this fall, though we’re not sure for how much.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]

Periodic Table Gets a New Element You Can Scan(dium) for More Info

Periodical Table of Elements with QR Code

I love chemistry in ways that few people would understand (unless they also happen to be a huge science geek like me.) It’s the central science, after all, with the rules of order and disorder both working for it at the same time. So what’s note to like?

Unfortunately, school sometimes takes all the fun out of the it by making kids memorize the periodic table and quizzing them about what color flames a certain element causes when it burns. Learning doesn’t have to be such a drag, though, and it doesn’t have to be so taxing either. That’s probably what Yiying Lu had in mind when she came up with interactive QR-enabled Periodic Table of Elements. Aside from each block containing the element’s symbol, name, atomic number, and atomic weight, it’s also got a teeny weeny QR code printed to the side. When you scan the code of the element you’re interested in, you’ll automatically be directed to the Wikipedia entry of that element where you can read all about it and get the bigger picture.

The best part? Lu has made her interactive periodic table free for everyone to download. You can get it here.

[ Walls360 ] VIA [ Dvice ]