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Tag Archives: 3D printing

PancakeBot Brings Automation To Your Breakfast


Everyone’s used to eating their pancakes in a bland round shape. It’s not like having them be any other shape than round is going to make them taste better, but if you’re easily amused (or have young children), the PancakeBot might interest you. It’s kind of like a 3D printer, only for pancakes. And it’s not quite 3D since it doesn’t build them up vertically. It’s also not completely automated, since you do have to flip them yourself. But if you’re looking to make your pancakes into all kinds of creative shapes, this is the way to go. The PancakeBot comes with an SD card pre-loaded with shapes, and there’s also tracing software that lets you create your own. An extruder will pump the batter out in any shape you want, although you do have to be careful with the kind batter you use and not have anything too clumpy or with fruits or chocolate chips in it. We also suspect the novelty will wear off after your 25th Eiffel Tower, but hey, there are definitely worse ways to spend the $179 pledge necessary to get your own.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ Gizmag ]

You’re Looking At A Rubber Band Race Car


That’s right. That sweet looking locomotive construction is a remote controlled race car whose only power comes from a single elastic rubber band tightly wound into 8-inch (203-mm) loops, and stuffed into a carbon fiber tube that runs the length of the car. It’s called the Cirin, and is the creation of “students Max Greenberg, Sameer Yeleswarapu and Ian Cullimore at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. They created it to compete in the school’s Formula E Race, an annual event in which teams from around the world pit their custom-made rubber band-powered miniature cars against one another.” The Cirin’s body and frame is modelled after the internal structure of a bird’s wing bones, which allows it to withstand the high torsional forces created by the rubber band. The 6 ft (5 m) of looped elastic allowed it to travel 500 ft (152 m) at speeds of up to 30 mph (48 km/h), which is pretty impressive… but didn’t win the team the race. They did receive an award for best design, build, and approach, so it’s kind of hard to tell who ‘won’ in the end. It reportedly cost them $500 to make, but that doesn’t include the donated laser sintering, 3D printing job by 3D printing company SolidConcepts.


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3D Printed Lacelamps Project Intricate Patterns On Your Walls


Artists Linlin and Pierre-Yves Jacques have created a collection of lamps that integrate a 3D-printed element reminiscent of lace. When the lights are turned on, they project a cool web of patterns all over your room, while the lamps themselves do look kind of neat. We’re not sure how much they cost or whether they’re even for sale, but we can’t imagine why they wouldn’t be. There are two types, filed under “Sky” and “Land”, meaning one hangs from the ceiling while the other stands on a surface.

Hit the jump for a bunch of pics.


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Fully-functional 3D-Printed Drone Made Using 3Doodler pen

3D printed drone made using 3Doodler pen

We have come a long way since the 3Doodler – the 3D printing pen, surprised the world by raising over $2 million on Kickstarter. One thing that has changed for good since then is that some of the most incredible works of 3D art have been designed using the 3Doodler. Case in point is this 3D printed flying hexacopter drone made entirely with the 3Doodler. Created by Louis DeRosa of Plasticity Productions, the 3Doodler printed hexacopter can actually fly like an efficient drone.

Except for the motor, motherboard and battery, everything on DeRosa’s drone is made from 3D printing. Like many 3D creators would affirm, working with the 3Doodler is just like working with the pen on paper, but it wasn’t as simple for DeRosa. The first version of the drone he conceived had some design flaws and proved to be a little off balance. If you’ve built your own drones, or have used a hexacopter like this, you’d know – complete balance is key to a hexacopter’s consistent flight.

Working more cautiously on the things he’d done incorrectly, DeRosa created the second version as a 6-winged flying drone. It took DeRosa a few hours to work upon the first version and arrive at a fully tested second and final version.

VIA [ 3D Print ]

3D4C 3D Printer Brings Full Color Printing To The Game


Getting stuff 3D printed is neat, but you usually end up with a monochrome item that later needs to be painted. While some see this as an opportunity to get creative, other might prefer to have the option to output in colour immediately. The 3D4C 3D printer pictured above combines 4 filaments to create a wide range of colours in your prints. It’s billed as the first CYMK 3D printer, and we’re inclined to believe them. And despite featuring relatively novel technology, this printer claims to be able to achieve 100 microns of resolution, which is on par with the Replicator 2X. Currently raising funds on Kickstarter, an £850 ($1,420 USD, roughly) pledge should get you a unit. But hurry since this is Early Bird pricing, and it goes up once the initial 100 units are sold.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ WalYou ]

Mini Me, Mini You: Shapify 3D Selfie

Shapify 3D Selfie


Taking selfies one step farther and giving them the 3D treatment is Shapify. Their service lets you turn your self-portraits into a three-dimension action figure that you can proudly display in your home or office. All you need is the Shapify app and a Kinect sensor (borrow your neighbor’s, if you don’t have one!) to 3D scan yourself.

When you’re done, send it off to Shapify to order your selfie figurine. We have to warn you, though, this definitely costs more than your average selfie, since it’ll set you $79 back.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gear Hungry ]

Normal Earphones Are Custom Printed To Fit Your Ears


Ears are like fingerprints: no two are alike. Earphones on the other hand tend to come mass-produced in one shape only. This means you’ll either get an ok fit, or a terrible fit, but rarely will you get an exact fit. Normal Earphones hope to change all that by allowing you to make custom 3D-printed buds. Just take a picture of your ears with your smartphone, send it to the company for processing and less than 48h later they’ll be in your hands. They use “nerdalicious software and 3D printing to sculpt each one-of-a-kind pair”, while also integrating some high-end components to match their custom fit with quality sound. At $200 for the pair, we sure hope they mean that.

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[ Product Page ]

3D-Printing Pen CreoPop Doesn’t Use Hot Plastic As Its ‘Ink’

CreoPop 3D-printing pen

Th 3D-printing pens we’ve seen thus far work by melting plastic “ink,” which then harden as it cools into whatever shape the user chose to draw or form. Think of it like a glue gun in pen form that extrudes plastic instead of glue, and there you go. Bringing something different to the table, however, is CreoPop.

CreoPop takes the heat out of the equation, and it’s all possible thanks to the type of plastic that it uses: a light-sensitive resin that hardens upon exposure to UV light. Since it doesn’t use heat, it opens the door for many more applications and makes it safer to use for those who are normally clumsy and for kids, too.

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PancakeBot 3D Prints Delicious Pancakes


What do you get if you slap together a hot plate, an Arduino controller, some stepper motors, and an acrylic supporting structure? A PancakeBot, is what. It’s a 3D printing machine that is absolutely unlike the boring old combination of printer assembly and widely used ink cartridges that can only print 2D images of the most delicious pancakes in the world. The PancakeBot’s creations will taste as delicious as they’re elaborate. Simply load up the batter, settle on a design, and watch as the print head lays down an edible Eiffel tower, a scrumptious SpiderMan face, or a fluffy galloping horse.

In the works since 2010 by one Miguel Valenzuela, the current version of PancakeBot doesn’t use its initial LEGO Minstorms structure and is a little more involved in its fabrication. Although not available commercially, Miguel does use this prototype to teach children in after-school programs about engineering, robot building and programming.

[ Product Page ]