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Tag Archives: 3D printing

3D Printed Modular Wine Rack is Ingenious In Its Versatility


We come across a lot of wine racks while sourcing content for OhGizmo! But we’ve rarely seen a product as ingenious as the GustaVino 3D printed modular wine rack. By using some clever hexagonal geometry, the modules are able to accommodate wine collections of varying sizes without leaving many empty spots as your numbers dwindle. The basic three-piece kit can handle between 1 and 4 bottles with just a little reconfiguration, for instance. And as your collection grows, you can simply add more hexagons; the modularity allows you to build out the overall rack in different ways, and let your imagination run wild.

You can purchase the digital file for £19, and print as much rack as you want at home. But if you don’t just happen to own a 3D printer, prices for pre-made modules start at £19 for a 3-piece kit, £39 for a 6-piece, and up to £137 for a 24-piece monster.


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3D Printed Stormtrooper Foosball Heads


We’ve heard it a million times: “I have a 3D printer, but I have no idea what cool stuff to print!” Well, guys, here’s a fun project. If you have a foosball table, YouMagine member Excite created a set of Stormtrooper heads that you can use to replace the ones currently on your table, by simply snapping them over the standard ones. Of course, there are limitations: it’ll only work if you have a Sportcraft table, plus it’ll upset the balance of the players which some more serious aficionados might dislike. But if you’re really looking to spice up your table, the files are available for download on the YouMagine website.


[ Product Page ] VIA [ Technabob ]

A Frankenstein Light Switch


Wanna add a bit of flair to your living space? How about the Frankenstein Light Switch? It’s a plastic cover for your light switch that ends up making it look like a giant Frankenstein style circuit breaker. It comes in single or double switch versions, for $10 or $15. Comes unpainted, so it’ll fit any decor. Unfortunately, high demand means you may have to wait up to 10 weeks to get yours, but if you have access to a 3D printer, the file is also available for you to print at home.


[ Product Page ] VIA [ Technabob ]

This Giant Free-Form 3D Printer Can Print Houses


The good folks at Branch Technology, a startup founded by architects in Chattanooga, Tennessee, are developing technology that would allow architects and constructors much more freedom in the kind of buildings they erect. Using a repurposed automotive manufacturing robot made by Kuka, the Branch team developed a giant free-form 3D printer that extrudes a mix of plastic and carbon fiber. This is used to create a 3D lattice which is then reinforced with denser, stronger materials like concrete, eventually becoming a solid structure. The idea being that walls of pretty much any shape can be pre-built this way, and sent in scaffolding form to the construction site. Once there, construction workers assemble them and fill them with stronger materials, turning a fanciful curved wall into a permanent structural element. Each modular element fits together with the others like LEGO, making it possible for a project manager to simply send a digital file to Branch, only to later receive a completed framework for their building, ready for solidification and assembly.

Currently, Branch’s facilities allow for the production of up to 20 homes a year, with plans to expand as demand increases. Branch founder and CEO Platt Boyd says “We want to be the Shapeways of architecture.” They certainly seem to be off on a good start for that.


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Make Your Own Pocket Laser Engraver


The main reason I haven’t bought a 3D printer is that I suspect that once that initial “gee-whiz, I can print objects” phase has passed, I’ll be hard pressed to find useful things to actually print. But projects like Thingiverse member Isolt’s Photon Printer, a Micro Laser Engraver, make me realize there are plenty of people working to provide us with things to do with these fancy printers. In this case, you’re looking at a little device that uses repurposed DVD drives as well as 3D printed parts to create a laser engraver, capable of, well, engraving anything you want on a variety of surfaces. It’s not a project for beginners, but if you’re got some time on your hands and know your way around electronics, you should be able to pull it off.

[ Thingiverse Page ] AND [ Instructables Step by Step ] VIA [ Technabob ]

Here’s Something Fun You Can 3D Print


Buying a 3D printer is all fun and games until you realize you’re running out of fun things to print. Now and then, however, we see something cool, like this Dremel Devil. It’s a plastic fan inside a cylinder, and it’s meant to be launched off a Dremel rotary tool. If done right, you’ll see this little toy soar up to 200 feet up in the air.

It’ll require a little bit of trial and error to figure out just how much pressure to use when inserting the Dremel Devil in the adapter, but a small learning curve shouldn’t keep anyone from having fun with this for at least a day or two. The file is free on the Thingiverse.

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[ Download the Dremel Devil ]

Orbit1 Brings Electroplating To The Home


You may have bought a 3D printer, and that’s all well and good, but maybe you’re growing tired of making plastic objects. Plastic is great and all, but you know what’s nicer? Metal. Now, with the Orbit1 Tabletop Electroplater, you can take a freshly printed object, and plate it in Copper or Nickel, with options for Gold and Palladium if the company’s crowdfunding goes well. The way it works starts with you polishing and finishing your object as well as you can. Then you have to spray it with a conductive paint and wait a few minutes for it to dry. When that’s done, just dip it in the electroplating solution and wait as the process completes. An app will allow you to track progress, and in as little as a few minutes or up to a couple of hours (depending on the desired thickness of the coating), you’ll have a metal object that you printed at home.

Want to make your loved one a nice ring? This is the way to go. Heck, it doesn’t even have to be something you printed; you could make a gold plated tree leaf for all you care. The machine itself will set you back a hefty $1,999, while the electroplating solution works out to about $2 per gram, in Copper. That’s a heck of a lot, but could be a nice investment for someone looking to start a small business, maybe an Etsy shop or something. If the funding is completed, expect delivery by August 2016.


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Give Your 3D Printer Color Abilities With The Palette


The 3D printing scene is thriving at the moment, but some realities still exist. Specifically, if you hope to be able to print in color, you will have to spend more money on more sophisticated multi-nozzle systems, which print slower, and smaller. But if you already own a printer, you should know that The Palette will be able to give it the ability to print in color, with the one filament system it already uses. The way is works is by sitting between the color filament spools, and your machine. It can take up to four different such coloured filaments, and cut them and splice them as needed to then feed them into your printer. It simply analyzes the model you hope to print, and creates a custom multicoloured filament on the fly. It requires no modification to your machine, so as long as it accepts standard 1.75mm filaments and runs on .gcode or .x3g, you’re good to go. It’s an ingenious solution that, while being expensive at $899, will still save you quite a bit of money versus current color-capable printers on the market.

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[ Project Page ] VIA [ Engadget ]

Retouch3D Pen Lets You Clean Up Those Messy 3D Prints


Unless you’ve ever owned a 3D printer, you might not know that quite often the objects they spit out contain small imperfections, be it little filaments that stick out, supporting structures that need removing, or stray plastic. Most people have gotten used to applying the finishing touches with sandpaper, razor blades or even irons, but these are all crude. The Retouch3D is a variable-heat pen made specifically for the task of, well, retouching your 3D prints. It can be set at the exact melting points of the various materials used in the printers, from PLA (polylactic acid), ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), resins or even wax. And then the heat can be varied in small increments so you can get exactly the kind of viscosity you’re looking for. Additionally, there are 5 interchangeable heads, allowing you to perform various tasks like removing, refining, or blending.

If you want yours, you’ll have to pledge $149 on their fully-funded Kickstarter campaign, and hope to get it by December, their expected shipping date.

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