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Search Results for: kids

Superhero Backpacks Let Kids Take Flight at School

Superhero backpack I used to be one of those kids who would cry when it was time to go back to school. Not my proudest moments, I know. For whatever reason, some kids just don’t like going to school and it’s up to their parents to find a way to motivate them and make them understand that it’s for their own good–and for their future. After all, school is their gateway to a world of knowledge, where they can let their imagination and creativity take flight as they grow and learn.

Driving that point across are super moms Daphne and Rena, who created the SuperME backpack. Each one features generic designs and doesn’t feature any commercial characters. The best part? Each SuperME backpack comes with a hoodie cape, which might come in handy in bad weather.

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Eight-Year-Old Spends $6,000 on In-App Purchases–Now See Why You Should Keep Your Phone Away From Kids?

Girl Spends 6K on Apple Apps

There are many reasons why you shouldn’t leave a kid alone with your phone. For one, they might delete messages or important emails without your knowledge. That could spell a lot of trouble for you, especially if they have to do with work. Another reason is that they often tap buttons they shouldn’t and end up making purchases that they haven’t cleared with you. This has happened to so many people all over the world, and yet parents still leave their kids with their devices.

Another case is that of Lee Neale and his eight-year-old daughter, who spend over £4,000 (about $6,000) on in-app purchases. Apparently, his daughter had seen him key in his password to purchase stuff and memorized it, keying it in later on when she made her own purchases.

Lee pleaded with Apple to cancel the purchases, but the former didn’t relent at first, and understandably so. It was only when Lee went to the media with his story that Apple granted him a refund. Continue Reading

This Shirt Turns Your Back Into a Playmat For Your Kids

Playmat T-Shirts For Parents

Now you can get some much-needed R&R during your kids playtime thanks to these awesome playmat t-shirts by Etsy seller Becky. They’re basic tees at first glance, but there’s a colorful railroad printed at the back that can double as a playmat for your kids. Just break out the toy box, pass around the toy cars, trucks, and action figures, and lie face down on a soft and comfortable surface. Preferably your bed.

The cars or trains going around the tracks on the playmat-slash-shirt will give you a gentle massage, and hopefully, it’s enough to keep your kids pre-occupied until dinner time.

They’re available online for $22 each.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Werd ]

1stfone Is A Cellphone For Kids… Really Young Kids

1stfone

How soon is too soon to give your child an iPhone? I say that as long as they’re under 18, they shouldn’t have one. But what do I know, I’m a cranky old fart. That said, you wouldn’t give a 5 year old a $700 smartphone, would you? But it still would make some sort of sense to give him the ability to call home on his sleepovers, or whatever the heck 5 year olds do when they’re away from you. That’s what the ’1stfone’ is for. It’s a dead simple handset which comes preprogrammed with 4 numbers, plus 999. That’s the emergency phone number in the UK, as this is unfortunately UK-only (and Northern Ireland, sorry). The child can easily press any of the four numbers, or answer a call if you wish to get in touch with him. And that’s all he can do with it. There’s no keypad for him to start making long distance calls, or touchscreen to play games, or anything; any change in the preprogrammed numbers requires calling customer service.

It’s a smart device that targets a neglected demographic and we sort of hope they succeed. It’s between £55 and £70 for the handset (depending on whether you choose Pay-As-You-Go or a Monthly plan) and plans start at £7.50 per month.

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[ Product Page ] VIA [ Ubergizmo ]

Awesome Smart PJs Will Read Bedtime Stories to Your Kids

Smart PJs

Pajamas don’t get any smarter than this. The aptly-named Smart PJs not only provide warmth and comfort, but they’ll also read your kids a bedtime story. Those patterns might just look like dots to you, but they’re more than just some design the pajamas’ makers decided to go with. Instead, they’re actually QR codes in disguise that’ll make your smartphone read a bedtime story or two to your child once you scan them.

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Teddy Sitter Keeps One Eye On Your Kids, and Another On Your Sitter

Teddy Sitter

Even the most hands-on parents leave their kids with the sitter sometimes, and that’s where gadgets like the Teddy Sitter comes in. It looks like a regular brown teddy bear that you can find in most toy stores, except that it’s got a large and shiny beacon-like nose where I assume the camera and sensors are located. Because while the Teddy Sitter looks like a toy, it most definitely is much more than just that.

It’s meant to double as a babysitter for your kids, but I think it’s always safest to get a human to do that job. But for your peace of mind, the Teddy Sitter lets on-the-go or absentee parents monitor what’s happening at home in a truly novel way.

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NotFound Project: 404 Error Can’t Find Your Page, But It Can Help Find Missing Kids

Internet 404

It’s pretty frustrating to click on a link, only to be redirected to a 404 error page because the link is broken. But there’s a new initiative in cybertown called the NotFound Project that has come up with a better way to handle these pages. Instead of displaying the usual 404 error when a page can’t be found, participating sites that have installed the module from the project will display a missing child alert instead. The alerts are cycled so a different one is shown for every error, with the profiles for the missing children pulled from a constantly-updated database.

The NotFound Project was set up by Missing Children Europe in collaboration with Child Focus. It only profiles kids who’ve gone missing in the European Union for now, but it would be interesting (not to mention beneficial for the whole world) if they turned this into a global endeavor.

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Wooden Toy Tablet Teaches Kids About Tech

Depending on how spoiled your child is, this will either be appreciated and used as a fun teaching toy, as it’s intended, or just be thrown right back in your face for not being “the real thing”. We’re hoping your three year old doesn’t fall in the latter category. The Tinker Tablet is a wooden tablet, made to look like an iPad or something, but with no electronic components. Instead, there’s a wooden puzzle inside that looks like a circuit board, and whose pieces represent different components of a mobile device. What’s interesting is that these pieces can be assembled into a “cellphone”, teaching your tot from a very early age that objects like mobile phones aren’t magical pieces of plastic, but are instead a collection of separate parts that work together to form a functioning device.

When not assembled into a cellphone, the pieces fit into the tablet base, and a dry erase board slides over them to not only secure them in place, but allow the kid to draw… kind of like what people do with actual tablets. It could be a fun, interactive teaching tool that will get the little one’s tech appetite sharpened from a very early age. Currently on Kickstarter, the Tinker Tablet can be yours with a $50 pledge.

[ Project Page ]

You Too Can Disappoint Your Kids With The 3D Sand Castle Printer

By David Ponce

Just look at those “creations.” They were made with the Spilling Funnel XXL. You put the water in, and the sand, and then it mixes into a sludge which pours from the spout, allowing you to create layer after layer of whatever you want. In principle you could potentially make pretty things with it, but if even the product shots show you a disgraceful sack of sand poo that tries to pass as something recognizable, you know your kids’ attempts will likely be even worse. Maybe if you set their expectations right and sell them on how this isn’t meant to make castles and turtles and other sandcastle-y things, but instead it’s an abstract art instrument… Maybe then they won’t feel inadequate? We’re not sure, parenting seems hard. We can however tell you that it’s $9.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Gizmodo ]