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Search Results for: GPS

Callaway Reveals Its New upro mx GPS Device – Should Probably Just Release An iPhone App Already

Callaway's upro mx GPS Device (Images courtesy Callaway)
By Andrew Liszewski

Yesterday Callaway revealed an updated version of their upro handheld GPS device, now bestowed with an ‘mx’ after its name, and a full-color multi-touch and gesture-friendly 2.2-inch LCD display. Obviously designed and optimized for use on golf courses, the upro mx comes pre-loaded with maps for more than 25,000 courses around the world, including high-resolution aerial photography of each course which apparently only they offer. And while there’s enough content on the device to get you going right out of the box, you can also download more detailed data for where you’re playing including a Virtual Green View with exact putting distances, SmartView which calculates the best virtual view based on where you’re standing and AnyPoint technology for extremely accurate distance measures.

The Callaway upro mx will be available in May for just $199, but I have to wonder why it couldn’t also be available as an iPhone app. I’m sure it’s still a must-have for some professional golfers who need highly accurate GPS distance readings, but I think the casual links player would find it far more convenient to have this built-in to their phone. And if that database of 25,000+ courses is too hefty to download at once, users could simply pull down offline copies of courses as needed. I’m fairly certain even the most avid of golfers won’t be playing at all 25,000 courses in their collection.

[ PR - Callaway Golf Introduces Next Generation upro GPS Device ]

[CES 2011] Nike’s TomTom Powered GPS SportWatch

Nike+ SportWatch GPS (Images property OhGizmo!)
By Andrew Liszewski

Realizing that not everyone likes to jog or run with an iPod strapped to their arm, Nike has created a new watch that works in tandem with their in-shoe Nike+ Sensor and provides the same functionality already built-into the iPods and their iPhone app. The advantage to using this watch though is that it’s not only waterproof, but it also features TomTom GPS hardware built-in. So while it’s keeping track of your steps via the in-shoe sensor, it’s also tracking where they’ve been taken, allowing your route to be analyzed on the Nikeplus.com website. And in order to keep things simple and battery life as lengthy as possible, the watch syncs to your PC, and the Nike+ website, via a USB connector integrated into the watch strap.

The watch sports an inverted monochrome LCD display and a robust UI that’s easy to navigate via a couple of buttons on the side of the case. And besides just keeping track of how far you’ve run and where you’ve been, the watch will also compare your performance against past results to let you know if you’ve improved, and of course will even nag you when you haven’t gotten out for a bit of exercise in a while. The Nike+ SportWatch GPS will be available on April 1, and while not specified, we were told that pricing should be comparable to other GPS-equipped watches already on the market.

[ Nike+ SportWatch GPS ]

My Custom TomTom Lets You Customize Your GPS Unit

My Custom TomTom (Images courtesy TomTom)
By Andrew Liszewski

Odds are if you’re really a stickler about having a matching interior in your car you’ve already got a built-in GPS unit in the dashboard, but TomTom’s new My Custom option is a handy way to have your navigation unit match the rest of your car if you’ve opted for an after-market unit. There’s a pretty large selection of pre-made designs to choose from on their website (depending on the model you choose) or you can upload your own images and add custom text all from their website. The printing itself is done by CafePress who have some experience with this kind of thing, and from what I can tell the added graphics add about $10 to the cost of the unit.

[ My Custom TomTom ] VIA [ SlashGear ]

Transcend Goggles Are First To Feature Integrated GPS

By Chris Scott Barr

Having a GPS is great when you’re visiting a new city. As there’s nothing quite like getting lost and having to stop in a seedy part of town and ask directions. However, if you’re somewhere that has no people to ask for directions, such technology is invaluable. That’s what makes these Transcend goggles so awesome.

The goggles feature a built in HUD which gives you information such as latitude/longitude, altitude, speed traveled, current temperature, time and more. The best part is that when you get back home, you can plug them into your computer and download the GPS information. The included software then overlays your route with Google Maps so you can see exactly where you’ve been. The spiffy goggles will set you back either $400 or $500 (depending on whether you want polarized lenses or not) and can be preordered now.

[ Zeal Optics ] VIA [ Technabob ]

Casio’s New EXILIM EX-H20G Hybrid GPS Camera Lets You Geotag Indoors

Casio EXILIM EX-H20G (Image courtesy Casio)
By Andrew Liszewski

Today Casio introduced a couple of new P&S digital cameras, with the EXILIM EX-H20G pictured here being the more interesting of the two, at least in my opinion. It’s got a 14.1MP sensor with 10X optical zoom, H.264 720P @ 30fps video recording capabilities, a 3 inch LCD display and CCD-shift image stabilization. Nothing that remarkable, unless you’re a world traveler who’ll appreciate the camera’s GPS capabilities.

Casio EXILIM EX-H20G (Image courtesy Casio)

The EXILIM EX-H20G boasts a hybrid GPS system which uses actual GPS positioning, in conjunction with an internal motion sensor, to pinpoint, or at least intelligently guess, a user’s position even when a GPS signal is unavailable. It uses the camera’s last known satellite-acquired position, information from the motion sensor and map data stored in the camera to mark the location of a photo even if you’re indoors. It might not be 100% accurate, but it’s better than nothing.

That map data also lets you use the EX-H20G as a handheld GPS unit while in unfamiliar territory, helping you get around and even reminding you where videos or photos you snapped were actually taken on a map. And if you want to make the most of your time being a tourist, it’s even got a database of 10,000 sightseeing photo spots around the world, which will alert you when there’s a POI nearby. Of course that extra functionality is bound to take a toll on the camera’s battery life, but nothing is free in this world right? The EXILIM EX-H20G will be available sometime in November for $349.99.

[ Casio EXILIM ]

Behind The Scenes As Yoda Records His Lines For Tom Tom GPS Devices


By Andrew Liszewski

First we got a glimpse of what it was like for the sound engineers to work with Darth Vader in the studio, and this time around we get to see them battling with Yoda’s unique sense of grammar while he records his lines for the Tom Tom GPS devices.

“You’re gonna kill people if you give directions like that.”

[ YouTube - Yoda recording for TomTom GPS - behind the scenes ] VIA [ Pocket-lint ]

Expresso GPS Is Just As Useful On The Back Nine As It Is On The Highways

Expresso GPS (Images courtesy Expresso Satellite Navigation Ltd.)
By Andrew Liszewski

This isn’t the first GPS device we’ve brought you designed for golfers, but the fact that the Expresso can also be used in your car as your standard navigational unit makes it considerably more versatile and easier to justify. On the golf side of things the unit licenses the iGolf software providing users access to their database of over 32,500 courses worldwide, or you can map your own course if your local greens aren’t listed. The software also lets you keep track of the score and stats of each round, and since the unit is water resistant, you shouldn’t have to worry about a little rain dampening your fun.

On the automotive side of things, the Expresso once again goes the licensing route with Navigon’s software and NAVTEQ’s map database. So you get everything from 2D or 3D map views depending on your preference, ZAGAT rated points of interest, multiple destination routing, lane assistance so you know where to be when exiting or merging on highways, and pretty much everything else offered by the Navigon software.

But the fun doesn’t stop there. With its 480×320 resolution display and SD card slot, the Expresso also serves as a half-decent media player while on the road and even though supported file formats aren’t specified on their site, it’s safe to assume that it at least handles the all-important DIVX format. I’ll also point out that the Expresso has a clever articulated screen design as you can see in the product shots, so you can use it sitting on the dashboard or with a windshield suction cup mount. And when unfolded you can even place it in one of your vehicle’s (car or golf cart) cup holders since a pair of pop-out spring-loaded stability wings will ensure a proper fit no matter how large it is. The only thing that’s missing is pricing and availability info.

[ Expresso GPS ] VIA [ I4U News ]

NavTeq GPS Map Updates Are Important

This is a Sponsored Post written by me on behalf of NAVTEQ. All opinions are 100% mine.

By David Ponce

When you read the news, there seems to be a steady stream of amusing GPS-related stories. Like the woman who recently decided to sue Google because the allegedly dangerous directions it gave her for an evening stroll eventually led to her being hit by a car. Or the couple that was stranded in the snow for three days because they followed the directions on their GPS down a snowy, undriveable path. Or even the man in the UK who was charged £2,000 for “driving without due care and attention”; he’d blindly followed his GPS’s instructions down a narrow cliffside path whereupon he’d gotten stuck in a wire fence only a few feet away from a 100ft drop.

Stories like that remind us not only of our growing reliance on GPS devices but also how important it is to know how to use them properly. Step one in that process is to have the latest maps loaded. Not only are new roads being built all the time while older ones being closed, but so are businesses and “Points of Interest” constantly changing. I recently received an SD card containing brand new North American NavTeqmaps for my Garmin Nuvi. Updating them was no harder than popping the card in, and booting the device. And while I might have a little more common sense than to drive into a pond because my GPS tells me to, it’s nice to know that I won’t drive 30 minutes to go to a nice restaurant only to find out it’s been out of business for two months. Should you have a NavTeq powered device and wish to update yours, link is below.

[ www.updateyourmap.com ]

Visit my sponsor: Map updates a must before summer road trips!

Kapten Talking Pocket GPS

Kapten Talking Pocket GPS Navigational System (Image courtesy Amazon)
By Andrew Liszewski

You can kind of consider the the Kapten Talking Pocket GPS from Kapsys to be the iPod Shuffle of GPS devices. It’s easily one of the smallest GPS navigational aids on the market, and it manages to stay so petite by foregoing an LCD display. Instead, it talks you to your destination with spoken directions. And to tell the Kapten where you want to go, you quite literally tell it where you want to go using spoken commands and voice recognition like “Restaurant: McDonald’s.”

The Kapten is also Bluetooth-equipped, allowing it to be paired with your cellphone and used to answer or make calls, and there’s a handy geo-tagging button that lets you remember a favorite location and share it online later. 3GB of on-board storage can be used for uploading additional map content (this version covers the United States only) or you can fill it with music since it also functions as a voice-controlled MP3 player, just like the iPod Shuffle. However, unlike the iPod Shuffle, the display-less Kapten doesn’t come with a budget-friendly price tag. It’s currently listed on Amazon for a whopping $475.

[ Kapten Talking Pocket GPS ] VIA [ GadgetGrid ]