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Category Archives: Digital Cameras

Canon Launches HD Video Recording Entry Level DSLR Camera

canont1i-sb

by Shane McGlaun

A couple years ago, I moved from a simple point-and-shoot camera to a much more complex Nikon D80 DSLR. At the time, the D80 was one of the best cameras you could get. The thing I missed right away with the D80 compared to my old camera was the ability to shoot video, but at the time, no DSLRs were able to record video.

Today things are much different and there are several DSLR cameras on the market that can shoot video in HD resolutions, like the Nikon D90. Canon today announced a new entry-level EOS Rebel T1i DSLR camera that can record video in full 1080p resolution, though at only 20 fps.

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Canon Introduces Three New HD Camcorders

This post is syndicated with permission from Gadgetoholic.com

When camcorders first launched decades ago the image quality was bad, the cameras were huge, and lots of tapes were needed to record anything. Today camcorders are very small, image quality is now often HD, and tapes are mostly a thing of the past.

Canon introduced three new camcorders that all record to internal storage in full 1080p HD resolution. The camcorders are all in the VIXIA line and record in 24Mbps bit rate in AVCHD format. Canon says that 24Mbps is the highest bit rate that can be used in the AVCHD format and makes for more detailed and smoother video recordings.

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Sony Announces Thin Cameras Big on Features

This post is syndicated with permission from Gadgetoholic.com

I usually shoot pictures with a Nikon D80, but I still like to keep a nice, small point-and-shoot around for the times I don’t feel like hefting the behemoth D80 around. A thin point-and-shoot that can be slipped into a pocket or backpack is a welcome addition for most people who like to shoot with more advanced cameras typically.

Sony announced a pair of new cameras this week that are perfect for those looking for thing cameras. The DSC-T77 is very thin at under 5/8-inch thick — making it perfect to complement my DSLR. The T77 may be thin, but it still packs in lots of features including a large 3-inch touch sensitive LCD, Smile Shutter, face detection and ISO sensitivity up to ISO 3200.

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Pentax Launches Cheap Optio E60

This post is syndicated with permission from Gadgetoholic.com

Digital cameras are getting smaller, cheaper and growing megapixels all the time. It’s funny to think about how expensive digital cameras with 10-megapixels were not so long ago and now even the cheapest entry-level cameras sport 10-megapixel resolutions.

For example, Pentax announced its Optio E60 digital camera that will retail for under $140 when it launches in October. The camera has a 10.1-megapixel sensor and a 3x optical zoom lens. In addition to shooting still images, the camera can also record video.

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Panasonic Announces Lumix LX3 Digital Camera

This post is syndicated with permission from Gadgetoholic.com

When it comes to digital cameras you can go with the simple point-and-shoot camera or you can opt to go for the more difficult to use, but infinitely more flexible DSLR camera. For most users the point-and-shoot camera is the better option and many of the newer point-and-shoot cameras are starting to add features that were previously only found on DSLRs.

Case in point is the new Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3 digital point-and-shoot camera. The camera has a 10.1-megapixel 1/1.63-inch CCD developed specifically for the camera and can shoot RAW format images. Panasonic says that the special CCD used in the camera is 40% more sensitive and saturation is increased by 35% compared to other Panasonic 10.1-megapixel cameras. The CCD can also capture images in three aspect ratios including 4:3, 3:2, or 16:9. The camera also features a Multi Aspect mode that shoots images in all three modes at once and allows users to pick the one they prefer.

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HD Camera That Fits In Your Pocket And Doesn’t Rob Your Wallet

By Jonathan Kimak

DXG has come up with the DXG-567V, a High Definition digital video camera that is just over 4 inches long and comes in four different colors (red, blue, black and pink). It records 720p using H.264 Video Compression (using the MOV format) and also has a built-in retractable USB cord and a web-upload feature that makes it easy to upload your videos to sites like YouTube.

The price is fairly good too, just $179 US.  But of course with the low price comes some serious sacrifices, like no optical zoom. Instead it has a measly 2X digital zoom, along with the extra-low flash memory of 32MB (it can take SD cards) and a 2 inch display on the back.

It seems rather crazy to have a High Definition Camera with 2X digital zoom. But hey, you’ll have the best looking blurry home movies on the block.

[ DXG USA ] VIA [ Electronista ]

MS LifeCam VX-7000 Webcam Review. Verdict: Tight Live! Services Integration

By Ian Chiu

The LifeCam VX-7000 USB webcam is part of the promotional effort by MS’ hardware peripheral department to increase consumers’ awareness of their Windows Live! services. The camera itself isn’t any groundbreaking; you won’t find any motorized base nor auto focus, even though the latter of which is becoming the de facto feature on high-end webcams. The most notable improvement is perhaps the glass element lens for better image quality. Hardware-wise, the VX-7000 hasn’t quite caught up with Logitech and even Creative yet.

However, the VX-7000′s software acts as the heart of the fully integrated Windows Live system, coordinating between the webcam, Windows Messenger, Windows Media Player, Windows Live Spaces, and Windows Movie Maker for a complete Microsoft communications package. In real terms, this system means that you can use your webcam to not only video conference with your Windows Messenger-using friends and colleagues, but also record podcasts and video podcasts and upload them to Microsoft’s social networking site to share with others. And this pretty much covers most aspects of the software.

For the full review, hit the link after the video effect demo below.

While I thought Microsoft did a good job constructing a desktop-friendly camera that fits well on any LCD and handles video conferencing and smaller size video podcasts without any problems, I was disappointed to find that the camera’s high definition options were usable only with a sacrifice in quality. As a result, while this camera is a good option for someone looking to make video call or lower resolution podcasts, there are other cameras out there that will accomplish the same task for less money.

[MS LifeCam VX-7000 USB Webcam @ Everything USB]

Olympus Develops 360 Degree Camera Lens

olympus 360 degree lens By David Ponce

Every now and then, R&D departments spew out prototypes that look promising enough that we can imagine them making their way into finished products one day. Recently, Olympus has announced the development of an “Axial symmetrical free curved surface lens”. This lens is capable of gathering light from 360 degrees horizontally and 45 degrees vertically, and focusing it on a CCD without the use of other lenses. While only a prototype at the moment, possible uses for the lens include security cameras… and extreme sports.

Yeah, there are other 360 cameras on the market. But if our understanding is right, the innovation in this case is that the one lens does all the focusing, negating the need for extra lenses, and allowing the manufacturing of more compact devices. Of course, we’re gleaming this from a Spanish article, and a translated Japanese page. So if any Japanese native speakers can help us out, you’d enlighten a whole bunch in the process.

[ Press Release (Translated from Japanese) ] VIA [ Xataka ]

Mecablitz External Flash For Compact Digicams

Mecablitz

By Evan Ackerman

Personally, I would almost never recommend using the on-camera flash of a compact digital camera. Not only is it invariably unbalanced and underpowered, but the proximity of the flash to the lens often causes nasty reflections. So if you’re determined to use your compact digicam for flash photography, you might consider the Metz Mecablitz 28 CS-2 external digital flash. It bolts right to the tripod mount on the bottom of your camera (or you can hold it or put it somewhere else), and is quite easy to set up and use. No wires or connectors are necessary; the Mecablitz simply watches for your camera to flash and then sets itself off. You can set a variety of options including delays, power adjustment, and optimum flash distance. It accepts AAAs, and can get over 100 flashes off of a set of rechargeables. The big downside for me would be that you still have to set off your on-camera flash to trigger the external unit, although with some creative use of the delay feature and your camera’s red-eye reduction you could probably get around that. Oh, and the other big downside is that it costs $175.

You can read a full review at Digital Lifestyles.

[ Metz Mecablitz 28 CS-2 ] VIA [ Red Ferret ]