For behind the scenes pictures, stories and special contests, follow us on Facebook!
Subscribe:

Author Archives: David Ponce

Deal Of The Day: Last Chance For The 95% Off On Award-Winning Maclovin’ Bundle

Screen-Shot-2014-08-12-at-9.06.44-PM-740x228

There’s 11 hours left for you to own the heavily discounted Maclovin Bundle pictured above. Here’s how we described it the last time we featured this deal:

A MacLovin Bundle? What’s not to like? For $39 you can get your virtual hands on $861 worth of stuff for the Mac. That’s 8 applications, including Cinemagraph Pro ($100 value) and djay (a $20 value), as well as access to the OS X App Masterclass, a $500 value. With that eCourse, you’ll get 22 hours of instruction to learn how to code for the Mac.

[ Get The Award-Winning Maclovin' Bundle! ]

When A 6-Pack Of Beer Isn’t Enough, There’s A 99-Pack

99-pack-of-beer

We’re not sure why you wouldn’t just buy a darn keg of beer, but if you absolutely must get your malted beverages in a cardboard box, you should know that an Austin brewery has you covered. Austin Beerworks is selling a 99-pack of beer called the Peacemaker, and it’s going for $99. Our math skills put that at $1 a beer, which isn’t too shabby a price. The monstrosity weighs 82 lbs., is 7 feet long and presents logistical nightmares that are of little significance to people who are just looking to get hammered, we suppose. It won’t fit in your fridge for instance. And you won’t be able to carry it alone, for another instance. But hey, it’s a 99-pack of beer, and how often do you come across that? Check out their website, instagram and other social media to find out how to get your own.

Continue Reading

Bygen’s Hank Direct Bike Collapses, Uses Direct Drive System

bygen-8

The final size limitation that folding bikes often encounter is the chain; you can fold the bike, sure, but you can’t do the same to the chain. Bygen’s Hank Direct Bike simply ditches the chain and switches it for a direct-drive system. This means the pedals are directly powering the rear wheel, much like a Penny-farthing’s pedals power the front wheel directly. But unlike a Penny-farthing, the Hank isn’t a fixie: it has a hub transmission with three available gear ratios. The pedals extend forward and are placed at a natural angle beneath the rider, while the entire bike doesn’t actually fold but rather telescope back into itself. The top post is completely adjustable, so even when you take it out of the retracted position, you don’t have to slide it all the way forward, allowing you to lock it in place at the most comfortable distance.

The lack of chain makes this bike ideal for the business commuter since you won’t be getting any grease on your pants, and its small retracted size lets you keep it somewhere in the office without too much trouble. Price and availability haven’t been announced, however.

bygen-7

Continue Reading

Soba Cable Organizer Cleans Up That Mess Behind Your Monitor

Bluelounge_Soba_Cable_Organizer

Most of us choose to entirely ignore the area behind our monitors, just because we’re too lazy to deal with the spaghetti clutter of cables. If the putting-your-head-in-the-sand technique is running thin, you could try to give the Soba cable organizer from Bluelounge. Just slip them all into the “Vortex tube”and place them where you want it. The kit comes with 3 mounting caps, which can be affixed to any surface and help route the tube in your desired path. There’s even a Y-split, in case some of your cables have completely different destinations. For $25, it’s a cheap and efficient way to today up your living space.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Werd ]

Cardboard Jet Fighter Cockpit Big Enough To Accommodate Office Chair

cardboard-jet-fighter-simulator-cockpit-by-dogfight-boss

Getting work done or playing a sim game in a “real” cockpit, while having both feet firmly planted not the ground, is an ambition of some that usually requires lots of skill or very deep pockets. Dogfight Boss founder Lukas Homola thought he could do things differently, and decided to recreate the cockpit of an F22 fighter jet in an easy-to-asseble cardboard kit. He and a friend went to some aviation museums and took pictures of cockpits to recreate high definition textures for the kits. Since they’re made out of cardboard, it’s easy to cut out holes to fit any “instruments” you might want, like an iPad or a monitor or anything else you like. They’re made out of cardboard ribbing for durability, and all the parts except the center console are simply slid into place and not glue, which makes disassembly a snap.

It’s a $500 pledge for a physical version of the cockpit, though for $48 you can get a print-at-home PDF.

[ Project Page ] VIA [ Technabob ]

Memobottle Is Shaped Like A Standard Piece Of Paper, To Better Fit In Your Bag

A4-A5-and-letter-sized-reusable-water-bottles-by

Reusable water bottles are great for the environment, but they’re used less often than disposable ones simply because they’re inconvenient to carry in a cramped bag. The Memobottle, despite its initially awkward appearance, could actually change a few people’s minds thanks to its shape. Flat and rectangular, the Memobottle comes in three dimensions: A4, A5, and Letter. Slip in into your bag or briefcase, and it’ll take up space alongside your other documents without disrupting the general shape of things too much. The A5 bottle carries 750ml (~25 oz.), while the other two carry 1.25L (~42 oz.). They are dishwasher safe and completely leak proof, and can be yours for a pledge starting at $20 for the A5 and $30 for the Letter sized Memobottle.

[ Project Page ]

Extra Shot Coffee Mug Livens Up Your Mornings

Extra-Shot-Coffee-Mug

We’re not sure how your boss is going to feel about it, but we certainly think that walking around the office with the Extra Shot Coffee Mug will make you the envy of your coworkers. After all, who hasn’t thought of spicing up a Monday morning with a little shot of pick-me-up in their coffee? The leatherette strap carries a tiny flask for the libation of your choice, while the mug itself appears to carry a standard size of American style Joe. It’s $15.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ ThatsNerdALicious ]

This Is Why You Can’t Get WiFi Signal In That One Room In Your Home

WiFi Apartment

How is it possible that you got this powerful router, and yet this one bathroom on the second floor never gets any darn WiFi? Jason Cole, a PhD student in physics wondered the same thing, but instead of cursing at his phone like most of us do, he decided to investigate. The picture above is the result of his efforts. After “mapping his own apartment and assigning refraction values to the walls, then applying so-called Hemholtz equations to model the electromagnetic waves’, he obtained a clearer view of what happens to the signal as the router is moved around. And while he did determine that the most optimal spot to place it was in the center of his apartment, he couldn’t do that, so he used his work to find the second best spot, one which would generate the most “tendrils” of coverage to the most places.

While most of us don’t have the knowledge to find the optimal spot for our router, the image above does highlight the fact that moving things around even just a little bit can make a rather large difference and that after some trial and error, you may be able to improve your situation dramatically.

[ Jason's Blog (math heavy) ] VIA [ Engadget ]

Satisfying: Watch 10,000 Buckyball Cube Get Destroyed

vxz1gigw6qxr7ugpgaks

Remember the Buckyballs, these tiny magnetic balls that could be arranged into fascinating 3D arrays? They’re now banned, you know, because we’re all kids and we need the Consumer Product Safety Commission to watch over us like hawks… But even though new Buckyballs can’t be sold, that doesn’t stop people from having fun with the millions that were sold before the ban. If you have 2 minutes to spare, you should watch the video below, featuring a 10,000 ball cube getting smashed to bits. It’s therapeutic in a way, knowing someone spent countless hours building it, only to smash it for our viewing pleasure.

That is all. Carry on.

VIA [ Gizmodo ]