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Search Results for: Rubik

There’s Nothing Puzzling About This Rubik’s Cube Mini Fridge

Rubik’s Cube Mini Fridge I’ve never mastered the skill of solving Rubik’s cubes, but there should be nothing puzzling about this Rubik’s Cube mini fridge. It’s basically a larger-than-life version of a typical (unsolved) Rubik’s cube. Pull on the discrete handle at the side to reveal the insides of the fridge that can fit up to nine cans of stacked soda cans.

Of course, the exterior doesn’t actually turn, so it will remain unsolved forever–or until you replace it. The fridge also comes with a warm and cool setting, so you can use it to keep stuff like leftovers warm and drinks cool.

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For Work and Play: Rubik’s Cube Desk Light

Rubik’s Cube Desk Light

The Rubik’s cube desk light is perfect for your desk. First of all, it’s a desk lamp, so you’ve got a legitimate reason to display this colorful little thing on your work station. Second, it’s a Rubik’s cube. It’s not just for show either, because you can actually play with this lamp as you would a regular Rubik’s cube. Regardless, it does make for a pretty awesome decorative piece, doesn’t it?

On a full charge, the Rubik’s cube will give you two hours of playing time. When you feel like giving your hands a rest or if you have to get back to work (yikes!), just mount it on the triangular base to recharge.Continue Reading

Brain Cube: It’s the Ultimate Rubik’s Cube

Brain Cube

There’s a pattern you have to take note of when you’re solving a Rubik’s cube–something about the colors and what they should look like relative to the ones around them. If you’ve mastered solving 3×3 cubes and no longer find 4×4 and even 5×5 Rubik’s cubes challenging, then maybe it’s time you gave the Brain Cube a shot.

It resembles the Rubik’s cube in form, but that’s where the similarities end. Instead of six colorful faces, the Brain Cube is only rendered in one color. It’s also got grooves and markings on the surface (like the ones on the human brain), which are meant to be used as a guide in putting the brain right again. And perhaps to distract the player, it’s made from a soft, squishy material to resemble an actual brain somehow.

It’s available for $35.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Red Ferret ]

Conjoined Rubik’s Cube Adds Another Variant To A Classic Puzzle

By David Ponce

We’ve covered Rubik’s Cubes pretty extensively over the years. You might not know this, but they come in innumerable flavours, from 3X3X9 mindbenders to touchscreen based versions. You can add to that list the above “2 in 1 Conjoined 3x3x3 Rubik’s Magic Cube.” The goal of this puzzle is clearly still the same so there really isn’t much else to explain. Folks who like the challenge of a freshly minted puzzle, know that this particular toy/challenge will set you back a very modest $14.

[ Product Page ]

Don’t Call It A Rubik’s Cube, But This Rubik’s Cube Will Kick Your Ass

By David Ponce

As you can imagine, the name “Rubik’s Cube” is registered. So this is the “IQ Brick Cube”. And if you were having trouble solving the original, expect to spend countless hours with this. Featuring one regular sized layer, there are then 7 or 9 extra layers which are much thinner. Being no mathematician, we calculate this increases the complexity a few million-fold. And although it looks almost impossible to solve, there apparently is a method to make things easier.

Both the 3X3X7 and 3X3X9 models are $27, available from Brando.

[ Product Page ] VIA [ Technabob ]

Fancy A $1,950 Shagreen Leather Rubik’s Cube?

Shagreen Rubik's Cube (Image courtesy Dunhill)
By Andrew Liszewski

Some people keep a solved Rubik’s Cube on their desks as nothing more than a decoration, and seem to get really, really angry if you completely mess it up while they’ve stepped out for lunch. (It was no reason to bust my favorite pencil in retaliation!) But imagine how upset they’d be if they had dropped $1,950 on this Rubik’s Cube from Dunhill which is covered in squares of dyed shagreen leather. (Which comes from sharks and rays these days.)

The cube itself is a “genuine competition standard Rubik’s cube” which basically means it’s your regular old plastic model, so there’s nothing special on the inside. But the individual squares of leather have been polished to a smooth finish which is apparently easier on the hands while solving the cube. A nice touch for sure, but I doubt anyone who spends almost 2 grand on a Rubik’s Cube is going to spend much time playing with it.

[ Shagreen Rubik's Cube ]

Scruble Cube Scrabble/Rubik’s Mashup

Scruble Cube (Image courtesy RSV Productions)
By Andrew Liszewski

If that Boardgame Remix Kit from a few days ago whet your appetite for breathing new life into all those games collecting dust in your closet, then the Scruble Cube should be right up your alley. It mashes up elements of Scrabble with the classic Rubik’s Cube (in a 4×4 configuration) to create a new spelling challenge that can be played by yourself, or against an opponent.

Like with Scrabble your goal is to get tiles lined up to spell out words with as many points as possible, though unlike Scrabble the tiles are all attached to a spinning 3D cube. If you crunch the numbers there are apparently over 7,401 septillion different combinations of the letters you can play, but what I like most is that when you end the game in absolute frustration you’re not left with loose tiles all over the living room after you’ve flipped the board. At $24.95 the Scruble Cube is a bit pricier than your standard Rubik’s Cube, but at least it improves your vocabulary. The only skill you learn from a Rubik’s Cube is how to carefully peel a sticker without dog-earing the corner.

[ Scruble Cube ]

Braille Rubik’s Cube Designed For The Blind

Rubiks

By Chris Scott Barr

It pains me to admit that I’ve never actually solved a Rubik’s Cube. Granted, it’s been years since I last tried, but I still feel disappointed nonetheless. One question that plagued me for some time was whether or not a colorblind person could solve the puzzle. Of course I later discover that I myself am at least partially colorblind, Since I can see the differences in the colors, I’m not too worried. Of course, for those that can see nothing at all, the game has little actual meaning. Thankfully one designer has decided to craft a cube which is playable even by the blind.

As you might have guessed, each block has a set of Braile on top it off. This is so that even someone who cannot see at all can have a real shot at solving it. Unfortunately we know not the price, nor if this product will ever make it to market.

[ Konstantindatz ]VAI [ GearFuse ]

Rubik’s Not Giving Up On This Whole Electronic Thing – Say Hello To The Rubik’s Slide

Rubik's Slide (Image courtesy Pocket-lint)
By Andrew Liszewski

The theme of this year’s Toy Fair seems to be: “Hey, remember those games you played with as a kid? Now they require batteries!” First it was Boggle who got a high-tech upgrade, and now it’s the Rubik’s Cube. Of course this isn’t the first electronic version of the Rubik’s Cube, that distinction goes to the less-than-well-received Rubik’s TouchCube with its $150 price tag, but the second time could be the charm!

Besides a slightly more reasonable MSRP of around $40 (£25), Rubik’s Slide features a different kind of puzzle gameplay with just 9 light-up squares that have to be twisted and turned to match a pre-determined pattern. According to Pocket-lint, Rubik’s Slide will come with over 10,000 puzzles of varying difficulty levels to keep the replay value high, and is expected to be available later this year.

[ Pocket-lint - Rubik's Slide plans to twist and slide its way into your puzzle life ]