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321 Water Bottle With Built-in Self-Filtering Plunger

321 Water Bottle (Image courtesy Half a Teaspoon)
By Andrew Liszewski

Besides convenience, the reason a lot of people buy bottled water is because they’re leery of the extra ingredients that might be lurking in regular tap water. And while re-usable water bottles with built-in filters do already exist, none of them look quite as slick as the 321 Water from a company called Half a Teaspoon. Once you fill the BPA-free 321 with water, you insert the alien-looking plunger mechanism into the bottle and then push it all the way down to the bottom. A carbon block filter removes any chlorine and unpleasant tastes or odors, leaving you with clean filtered water.

The carbon block filter lasts for about 100 uses, or about 50 liters, and a 3-pack of replacement filters will set you back $12.50, so while it’s not a one-time investment, it will easily end up being cheaper than buying bottled water in the long run. The 321 Water Bottle itself is available for pre-order for $44.60, but the company apparently needs 10,000 commitments in order to start production and hopefully deliver the bottles by the end of June.

[ 321 Water Bottle ] VIA [ Design Milk ]








  • msisaac

    As anyone who has ever used a french press coffee maker knows, this design sucks balls. In the french press coffee maker, you pour hot water over coffee grounds, then use a plunger with a filter on the end to “press” the grounds to the bottom of the pot, leaving only coffee water up top. It never works. Coffee grounds ALWAYS leak around the edges of the plunger. If something as big as a coffee ground can make it past the plunger, I'd be very worried to know what kind of microscopic, diarrhea-inducing bacteria make it past the plunger filter on this bottle.

  • msisaac

    As anyone who has ever used a french press coffee maker knows, this design sucks balls. In the french press coffee maker, you pour hot water over coffee grounds, then use a plunger with a filter on the end to “press” the grounds to the bottom of the pot, leaving only coffee water up top. It never works. Coffee grounds ALWAYS leak around the edges of the plunger. If something as big as a coffee ground can make it past the plunger, I'd be very worried to know what kind of microscopic, diarrhea-inducing bacteria make it past the plunger filter on this bottle.