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Panasonic Introduces 3D Washing Machine

panasonic-washing-machines

By David Ponce

This has been out since February, actually, but I can’t find any mention of it anywhere for some reason. It seems Panasonic has released for the European market three different models of washing machines that feature a special 3D sensor. Why?

As the advanced 3D sensor detects how the drum moves according to load, a variable speed control system uses that information to fine-tune motor operation. This eliminates unbalanced loads and creates an ideal three-dimensional washing effect. The result here is less stretching, less tangling and fewer wrinkles — and an altogether gentler effect on the clothes in the wash.

There’s also some talk of energy-saving, water saving and other environmentally friendly buzzwords.

It should currently be available in Belgium, France, Germany, Netherlands, Poland and the United Kingdom, followed by other parts of Europe over the course of the year.

Full press release after the jump.

Panasonic Corporation has announced that it will launch its first washing machines into the European market with the introduction of three new models: a premium model (NA-16VX1), a deluxe model (NA-16VG1) and a standard model (NA-14VA1).

The new washing machines features 3D Sensor Wash, a drum rotation speed control system with 3D acceleration sensors to ensure high performance clothes washing, and Inverter technology which assists in lowering sensory noise and vibration. Panasonic will introduce the three models from March 2009 in seven European countries including Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain and the United Kingdom followed by other European countries thereafter.
The prestigious EU A-20% energy efficiency standard uses 20% less energy than an ordinary A-category washer.

The three new models from Panasonic will offer a wide range of state-of-the-art options delivering a reliable and affordable performance. To meet the rising needs in environmental preservation and energy conservation, Panasonic has incorporated energy-saving technologies in its three models, which have received favorable results in other countries such as Japan. For example, Panasonic’s premium washing machine, the NA-16VX1, operates to the prestigious EU A-20% energy efficiency standard and so uses 20% less energy than an ordinary A-category washer. Also, combined with the highly innovative inverter, tilted drum and 3D sensor technologies, the three models are able to realize a high washing performance resulting in a shorter wash and using less water in the process. All these technologies are unique Panasonic ideas developed by in-house engineers.

All three models use 3D Sensor Wash technology to modify motor rotation and output for best possible washing performance. By tilting the drum at 10°, Panasonic has lowered the water level in the drum. This makes for enhanced control of drum movement and washing action. Even though the models use less water, the clothes are still rinsed well and freed of detergent residue.

As the advanced 3D sensor in the NA-16VX1 detects how the drum moves according to load, a variable speed control system uses that information to fine-tune motor operation. This eliminates unbalanced loads and creates an ideal three-dimensional washing effect. The result here is less stretching, less tangling and fewer wrinkles — and an altogether gentler effect on the clothes in the wash.

One factor contributing to a superior washing performance is an adequate soak procedure before the first cycle. The wide-angle shower at the top of the Panasonic machine, helps soak the laundry more thoroughly, bringing the detergent into the fabric quicker, again for better results. The Panasonic auto load sensor detects how large the load of laundry is, reducing water and energy consumption where necessary. A special foam sensor will register that there is too much foam and direct water to ensure the best washing result.

Panasonic designed the three models with ease of use and convenience in mind. With the large double-layer window acting as a heat protection surface and the door operating on the one-push-open principle, the tilt-angle design makes for easy loading and/or unloading. There is a time-saving 15-minute Rapid Program for small loads of lightly soiled items and a 60-minute Quick Program for larger ones. The three models also include an auto power off feature as an energy saving measure.

“Water is the earth’s most precious resource. A new Panasonic washing machine consumes about 44 liters of water per wash compared to the 100 liters used by a conventional 15-year-old machine. Add those savings together – i.e. 56 liters every wash – and you save anything up to 10,000 liters of water a year,” says Maik Stahlbock, Manager Major Domestic Appliances at Panasonic Europe.

Panasonic washing machines will be available in Belgium, France, Germany, Netherlands, Poland and the United Kingdom from March 2009, followed by other parts of Europe over the course of the year.

VIA [ Xataka ]








  • tommyhj

    well, I would be surprised to learn if anybody achieved washing my clothes in only 2 dimensions. Clothes would come out awfully flat I'd think. And centrifugal force dictates that tilting the drum would make no difference. Also, to my knowledge and experience, every modern washing machine has a sensor picking up erratic drum movement and subsequent motor adjustments to hinder unwanted machine-tumblings.

    The only innovation that matters here is maybe the energy saving one, but we've had energy saving washing machines for a decade now – all I see are small additions and improvements…

  • oDeskPromoter

    I like this article it gives me an idea on how to chose, I also found some helpful tips about that in this Hardware Website , Thanks a lot.

  • http://www.modernfurniturewarehouse.com/ Modern Furniture

    Seems a pretty good invention, but still I see and expect many issues will rise from this invention. Another thing is the price wasn't mentioned in this article.