For behind the scenes pictures, stories and special contests, follow us on Facebook!
Subscribe:
Taiwan’s World Games Stadium Is 100% Solar Powered

Taiwan’s World Games Stadium Is 100% Solar Powered

World Games Stadium (Images courtesy Deputy Dog)
By Andrew Liszewski

The dragon-like structure you see under construction in these photos is the ‘World Games Stadium’ in Taiwan, which is being built for the upcoming World Games. And what looks like dragon’s scales from afar are actually 8,844 solar panels which is enough to satisfy all of the stadium’s energy needs, and then some. The 14,155m2 roof has the potential to generate 1.14 gigawatt hours of electricity every year, which is actually enough to power 80% of the stadium’s surrounding neighborhood when it’s not in use. It was designed by Japanese architect Toyo Ito, cost around $150 million to build and can hold 55,000 spectators.

And in case you were wondering, the World Games is kind of like the Olympics, except that the 30 different competitions include diverse sports like sky diving, billiards, frisbee, sumo and tug of war. In other words, events I’d actually like to see.

[ Deputy Dog – taiwan’s cutting edge solar powered stadium ] VIA [ Inhabitat ]







.
  • mcman

    Why doesn't the USA ever build awesome structures like this? Do you have to be Asian to come up with this stuff? At least we have Milwaukee and their attempts at funky architecture.

  • addicting_games

    wow… man it's so amazing, when it will complete I'll must go to see it throughout.

  • addicting_games

    so good man.. I should go to see it through.

    addicting games

  • addicting_games

    such nice place i was wonder should i go there

  • addicting_games

    wow… man it's so amazing, when it will complete I'll must go to see it throughout.

  • addicting_games

    so good man.. I should go to see it through.

    addicting games

  • addicting_games

    such nice place i was wonder should i go there

  • http://woodworking-books.org Woodworking Project Plans

    It was designed by Japanese architect Toyo Ito