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General Dynamics Itronix GoBook MR-1 Takes A Licking, And Possibly A Grenade Blast, And Keeps On Ticking

General Dynamics Itronix GoBook MR-1 (Image courtesy Laptop Magazine)
By Andrew Liszewski

Oh sure, an all-metal chassis carved from a single piece of aluminum might look sleek, but I have my doubts that the latest MacBooks will survive the beating the General Dynamics (yep, the people who make tanks) Itronix GoBook MR-1 is designed to take. At just 2 pounds and 6.6 inches wide it might look like another run-of-the-mill netbook, but it’s actually engineered to meet or exceed the US Military’s MIL-STD-810F standard for drop, shock, vibration and temperature endurance. That and the $5,649 price tag definitely remove the GoBook MR-1 from the netbook category.

The GoBook MR-1′s 5.6 inch touchscreen display has a native resolution of 1024×768 and thanks to Itronix’s DynaVue screen technology it’s as viewable in direct sunlight as it is indoors. The MR-1 also features a full QWERTY keyboard that’s sealed to repel water and dust, a touchpad and a small joystick for controlling the cursor and a built-in GPS receiver, but only a single USB port on the back. However, more ports can be added via a small collection of customized docks designed for office or in-vehicle usage. While Laptop Magazine wasn’t really impressed by the performance of the MR-1′s 1.2-GHz Ultra Low Voltage Intel Core Solo U1400 processor, I guess durability is the real reason why anyone would pick one up.

[ Laptop Magazine - General Dynamics Itronix GoBook MR-1 ] VIA [ Ubergizmo ]








  • regrer

    You've been somewhat duped, I think. MIL-STD-810F is not an endurance standard but a testing standard. So if they apply the proper tests to this notebook, and it turns to ashes and dust, it still complies with 810F.

  • http://www.ohgizmo.com andrew liszewski

    Ah I see. I probably should have done a bit more homework on what that standard actually was. I was just 'paraphrasing' from the Laptop Magazine review, not that I'm pointing the finger or anything.

    Thanks for the heads up.

  • regrer

    You've been somewhat duped, I think. MIL-STD-810F is not an endurance standard but a testing standard. So if they apply the proper tests to this notebook, and it turns to ashes and dust, it still complies with 810F.

  • http://www.ohgizmo.com andrew liszewski

    Ah I see. I probably should have done a bit more homework on what that standard actually was. I was just 'paraphrasing' from the Laptop Magazine review, not that I'm pointing the finger or anything.

    Thanks for the heads up.

  • regrer

    You've been somewhat duped, I think. MIL-STD-810F is not an endurance standard but a testing standard. So if they apply the proper tests to this notebook, and it turns to ashes and dust, it still complies with 810F.

  • http://www.ohgizmo.com andrew liszewski

    Ah I see. I probably should have done a bit more homework on what that standard actually was. I was just 'paraphrasing' from the Laptop Magazine review, not that I'm pointing the finger or anything.

    Thanks for the heads up.