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3-Axis Bubble Level Keeps Your Camera Straight

By Luke Anderson

Last year I finally decided to bite the bullet and get a nice digital SLR camera. This has proven to be a worthwhile investment, as I’ve been able to capture images that wouldn’t have been possible with a cheaper device. I’m still far from taking professional-quality photos, but I’m getting better all the time. One issue that I’ll sometimes run into is keeping my camera level on certain shots. It’s usually not a big deal, as I can eye it, however, I can see where a professional might need to be more accurate than that.

This little Cube Hot Shoe 3-Axis Bubble Level makes sure that no matter which way you have the camera tilted, you’ll know when it is level. It fits into the same slot as your external flash, which means you’ll have to do without the extra light. Unfortunately it also means that depending on your camera (such as mine), even the regular flash would be rendered useless, since it wouldn’t be able to open. This little accessory will only set you back $11.

[ Brando ] VIA [ GeekAlerts ]








  • Martijn

    alternatively, buy a decent tripod.

  • Bob

    Not all surfaces are perfectly level, mind you. So you'd still need a device of this kind to get the perfect horizontal shot.

  • http://www.ohgizmo.com andrew liszewski

    A 'decent tripod' would most definitely have levels built into the base and the head, so no matter where you set it up, you could ensure the camera was perfectly level.

  • meh

    Chances are that if you need a level to keep your horizon straight you're taking a landscape shot, and using a flash would be idiocy.

  • http://www.aquick.org/blog Adam Fields

    Also, that's hard to use while looking through the viewfinder.

  • http://www.aquick.org/blog Adam Fields

    Also, that's hard to use while looking through the viewfinder.

  • http://www.aquick.org/blog Adam Fields

    Also, that's hard to use while looking through the viewfinder.